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SLX, SILEX SYSTEMS LIMITED
gone fishin'
post Posted: Nov 28 2013, 03:47 AM
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DOE announced Wednesday that it had selected the GE-Hitachi plan for reuse of the plant site. The plan, submitted by General Electric Hitachi Global Laser Enrichment, would use laser technology to re-enrich high-assay depleted uranium tails.

"Paducah is a proud city, and we are thrilled GE has placed its confidence in the people of Paducah to host this new state-of-the-art facility," the federal delegation — Sen. Mitch McConnell, Sen. Rand Paul and Congressman Ed Whitfield — wrote in a press release. "Paducah has a bright future ahead, and we are genuinely grateful to be a part of it."

Chad Chancellor, CEO of Paducah Economic Development, said he is excited by the news. He said it took a team effort to make the deal happen. Although it is a giant step forward, Chancellor said this is only the first step.

"We still have to go through contract negotiations, permitting and the building, but it's great news," Chancellor said. "We are committed to making this successful on the local level."

A representative from Gov. Steve Beshear's office said the governor spoke to the U.S. Department of Energy this morning, and he expects good news later in the day. We will have more information on this story as it becomes available.

Read more: The Paducah Sun - DOE selects GE Hitachi plan for Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

 
grevillia
post Posted: May 21 2013, 10:03 AM
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Test Loop Milestone Achieved

Test Loop


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seawindpilot
post Posted: Apr 23 2013, 08:21 AM
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The UK Govt in a smart move are selling their stake in Urenco. They know it is time to get out before the GLE plant becomes operational. They can see the writing on the wall. 2nd generation technology will be hopelessly outdated and rendered uneconomic by 3rd generation Silex laser Enrichment.

UK to sell stake in Urenco nuclear fuel firm
Urenko is jointly owned by the UK, the Netherlands and two German companies

The UK government is preparing to sell its one-third stake in Urenco, the world's second-largest provider of nuclear fuel.

The uranium enrichment company is estimated to be worth about 10bn euros ($13bn; £8.6bn).

Business and Energy Minister Michael Fallon said the "time is right" for the sale, adding it made "good commercial sense".

Several buyers are said to be interested in buying the stake.

They include French nuclear group Areva, the Canada Pension Plan Investment Board, and reactor builder Westinghouse.

The remainder of Urenco is owned by the government of the Netherlands, as well as by the German power companies E.On and RWE.

"The decision to proceed towards a sale comes after the government secured agreement from its Dutch and German partners," the UK's Department for Business, Innovation and Skills said.

As yet, no decisions have been taken with regards to how or when the sale will happen.

"Any sale will only be concluded if the government is satisfied that the UK's security and non-proliferation interests can be protected and that value for money is achieved for the UK taxpayer," the department said.

As Urenco owns top secret uranium enrichment centrifuge technology, which the authorities are eager to protect from falling into the wrong hands, all three countries would need to approve any sale of a stake.


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glenview265
post Posted: Apr 17 2013, 05:33 PM
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Nuclear power should be on the table: BCA Date April 17, 2013 - 4:04PM
Nuclear power should be put back on the national agenda, women should occupy 50 per cent of executive positions, and the teaching of Asian language should be compulsory in schools, Australia's peak business body says.

Describing the next six months as "critical" for Australia, the Business Council of Australia - representing the chief executives of Australia's largest companies - has slammed the lack of political focus on "creating jobs, raising living standards and securing long-term prosperity".

"In Australia, it's a choice. A choice that no-one seems intent to be making at the moment," BCA president Tony Shepherd told the National Press Club in Canberra today.

"Australia's current preparation for the future is somewhere between half-hearted and non-existent," he said. "Even though some of these challenges are well and truly upon us, we talk about them as though there's still some time.

Advertisement "We must act now, while we can secure national prosperity through careful and incremental change."

Mr Shepherd listed Australia's natural and intellectual endowments, strong business sector and institutions, social cohesion and social safety net, and proximity to the Asian economic powerhouses as key national assets.

But poor labour productivity, high costs, challenges to competitiveness, flat confidence and a weakening fiscal positioning needed solutions, he said.

"How many major projects have to fail or be deferred ... how many Australian businesses have to shut down ... how many Australians have to lose their jobs ... How many budget deficits are we going to run ... before we take action?" he said.

Speaking ahead of the release of a BCA report identifying nine areas for reform, including tax and regulation, infrastructure, energy, education and foreign investment, Mr Shepherd said Australia should:

  • Deliver consistent budget surpluses;
  • Introduce a hard cap on the size of government;
  • Produce an intergenerational report and green paper on tax that includes discussion of the GST;
  • Ditch COAG and Renewable Energy Targets;
  • Sell further infrastructure assets, including energy assets;
  • Make "practical" and "sensible" changes to the Fair Work Act;
  • Develop a "more nuanced approach" to investment from state-owned enterprises and sovereign wealth funds; and
  • Establish a retail bond market and a liquid institutional credit market.
On the politically contentious issue of energy and global warming, Mr Shepherd said both political parties needed to "accept the lowest cost method of encouraging the reduction of greenhouse emissions". The Coalition has promised to repeal the carbon tax if it wins the election.

He added: "Action of climate change shouldn't put our business competitiveness at a disadvantage by moving ahead of the rest of the world. And there should be no policy restrictions on the type of technology we use to lower emissions. Nuclear, gas and clean coal should all be on the table - not excluded on ideological grounds."

Other BCA aspirations are an increase in unemployment benefits, a "sustainably funded" national disability scheme, an end to long commutes in Sydney and Melbourne, and ensuring a diversified economy, including a "high-tech" manufacturing sector.

The BCA president also called for:

  • Australia to be in the top 5 countries for income per capita;
  • 90 per cent of students to complete year 12 or equivalent;
  • More than 95 per cent of year 9 students meeting literacy and numeracy standards;
  • The introduction of performance-based pay for teachers; and
  • A closing of the gap between indigenous and non-indigenous Australians.
The speech coincides with a launch of full-page ads by the council, urging leaders to focus on Australia's prosperity in the long term ''not just the next six months''. The federal election will be on September 14, four months after a budget in which a $10 billion deficit is expected.

Mr Shepherd told reporters that its plan "requires political leaders who are prepared to lose their jobs to get things done."

"The test of reform for us is whether it advances national prosperity over the long term. Not whether it advances the attainment or retention of power," he said.

"And it will unashamedly put business at the centre of maintaining and growing our national prosperity."

The council's members include Mike Smith of ANZ Banking Group, Origin Energy's Grant King


Read more: http://www.theage.com.au/business/the-econ...l#ixzz2QhgTCDUC

 
moosey
post Posted: Apr 12 2013, 10:32 AM
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A poster who calls himself Toby10 posted this on HC, I don't think he posts here or hasn't for some time so I will repost it here with credit to him.

I post it because it shows that the Uranium Enrichment Plant/s appear to be going ahead with possibly not one plant but two and maybe more in the future?


It also seems clear to me that they intend to use the laser system for enriching Uranium for more than just reprocessing tails or normal new UF6 which comes from the mines and is then treated to become UF6, I believe that this new advancement they are talking of is for special nuclear fuel from the Advanced Recycling Centre that GE talks about.

Happy days ..
Project Manager, Regulatory Affairs, Global Laser Enrichment Job

Date: Apr 10, 2013
Location: Wilmington, NC, United States
Description:
Job Number: 1736995
Business: GE Power & Water
Business Segment: Power & Water
About Us: GE looks for innovation everywhere. For 130 years, GE has been at the forefront of innovation, but finding solutions to the world's biggest problems has never been more important than right now. Join us today and become an essential part of the solution! Not just imagining. Doing. GE works. Looking for a challenge where your experience is valued? Come see what you can achieve as a leader with GE Power and Water!
Posted Position Title: Project Manager, Regulatory Affairs, Global Laser Enrichment
Career Level: Experienced
Function: Engineering/Technology
Function Segment: Product Design and Development
Location: United States
U.S. State, China or Canada Provinces: North Carolina
City: Wilmington
Postal Code: 28402-2819
Relocation Assistance: Yes
Role Summary/Purpose: GE is an equal opportunity employer, offering a great work environment, challenging career opportunities, professional training and competitive compensation.

The Global Laser Enrichment technology has successfully completed a licensing effort with the USNRC for a facility based on the Wilmington, NC site. This position will interact with the USNRC and DOE, as required, to maintain the license requirements in Wilmington, advance the technology further and support licensing efforts at alternative locations.
Essential Responsibilities:
In addition, in this role you will:
Lead and coordinate the licensing strategy, generation of licensing documentation, and interactions with the U.S. NRC for licensing of a new enrichment facility and other assigned projects, working with Project Managers, Engineering, Legal, Regulatory Affairs resources, and other involved internal and external parties
Responsible for implementation of management systems and reporting to corporate and regulatory authorities
Represent GLE during public affairs events
Accountable for quality and timeliness of all licensing deliverables to NRC and other internal and external parties, as well as timely resolution of all related licensing issues
Responsible for defining, scheduling, and resource planning as well as work direction of other Licensing Engineers for all licensing submittals and related activities
Responsible for coordinating with Project Managers and Engineering for defining, scheduling, and resource planning of engineering needed for licensing submittals and related activities
Stay abreast of regulatory trends and changes that may affect licensing and incorporate these changes into the licensing strategy
Work with the Regulatory Affairs team to plan, coordinate and provide GE representation as needed at NRC and other industry meetings dealing with licensing for assigned projects
Provide representation and lead GE participation in licensing-related industry task forces that affect licensing
Project Management of contracted work force providing licensing engineering supporting licensing including arranging for contracting of resources and budget control
Responsible for implementation of management systems and reporting to corporate and regulatory authorities
Qualifications/Requirements:
Bachelors Degree in Science or Engineering discipline
Minimum of 5 years of experience implementing NRC regulated programs such as Nuclear Safety, Radiation Protection, Material Control and Accountability and Transportation Licensing
ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

Currently hold or within the last 2 years hold a security clearance (NRC or DOE Q)
Additional Eligibility Qualifications: GE will only employ those who are legally authorized to work in the United States for this opening. Any offer of employment is conditioned upon the successful completion of a background investigation and drug screen.
Desired Characteristics:
NRC Licensing process and technical regulatory knowledge in one or more areas such as fuel facility licensing, new plants, fuel, operating plants
Existing NRC or DOE “Q” clearance
Prior experience in working / communicating with Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) personnel
Experience working with industry groups, such as NEI and Owners Groups, on nuclear licensing matters
Inclusive - Ability to communicate well with all levels of the organization; Open communication style and the ability to develop team relationships; Excellent interpersonal and influencing skills
Clear Thinker - Ability to make decisions with speed and accuracy, based on the best available information; Commitment to continually strive to increase knowledge with up to date information
External Focus - Ability to create a positive representation of GE externally to customers and regulators
Autonomy - Demonstrated ability to be a self-starter; ability to work independently with little to no oversight; ability to deal effectively with complex, ambiguous and contradictory alternatives
Why join one great company when you can join many? At GE, we’re passionate about making life better with new ideas and technologies. We’re diverse, supporting our communities in more than 100 countries. Experience personal growth and competency development as part of the GE team.

GE Power & Water provides customers with a broad array of power generation, energy delivery and water process technologies to solve their challenges locally. Power & Water works in all areas of the energy industry including renewable resources such as wind and solar; biogas and alternative fuels; and coal, oil, natural gas and nuclear energy. The business also develops advanced technologies to help solve the world’s most complex challenges related to water availability and quality. Numerous products are qualified under ecomagination, GE’s commitment to providing innovative solutions that maximize resources, drive efficiencies and help make the world work better. Headquartered in Schenectady, N.Y., Power & Water is GE’s largest industrial business. Follow GE Power & Water on Twitter @GE_PowerWater. Learn More about GE Power and Water Today!

To stay connected with exciting news and the latest job opportunities from GE AMSTC, Aviation, Energy Management, Oil & Gas, Power & Water and Transportation, follow us on twitter: @geconnections


Nearest Major Market: Wilmington
Job Segment: Regulatory Affairs, Engineer, Project Manager, Law, Nuclear Engineering, Legal, Engineering, Technology



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All posters Please note, the decision to either buy or sell this share is entirely the individuals choice, I am not authorised to give investment advice, I post here to discuss the merits of technology as I see it, which may or may not be correct? and any information here is worth what you paid for it! the moose is loose

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glenview265
post Posted: Mar 4 2013, 03:35 PM
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Sun & Life Riydah Saudi Arabia

When you open the following link it will take you to this company's technology webpage.

At the left of this page photos appear of technologies that they are testing. When the mouse pointer is moved over these photos Meehan Green shows up as a test partner

http://www.sunandlife.com/index-3.php


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moosey
post Posted: Feb 25 2013, 10:25 AM
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In Reply To: nebo's post @ Feb 25 2013, 05:33 AM

UCLA researchers develop new technique to scale up production of graphene micro-supercapacitors

By Davin Malasarn February 19, 2013 Kaner and El-Kady's micro-supercapacitors While the demand for ever-smaller electronic devices has spurred the miniaturization of a variety of technologies, one area has lagged behind in this downsizing revolution: energy-storage units, such as batteries and capacitors. Now, Richard Kaner, a member of the California NanoSystems Institute at UCLA and a professor of chemistry and biochemistry, and Maher El-Kady, a graduate student in Kaner's laboratory, may have changed the game. The UCLA researchers have developed a groundbreaking technique that uses a DVD burner to fabricate micro-scale graphene-based supercapacitors — devices that can charge and discharge a hundred to a thousand times faster than standard batteries. These micro-supercapacitors, made from a one-atom–thick layer of graphitic carbon, can be easily manufactured and readily integrated into small devices such as next-generation pacemakers. The new cost-effective fabrication method, described in a study published this week in the journal Nature Communications, holds promise for the mass production of these supercapacitors, which have the potential to transform electronics and other fields. "The integration of energy-storage units with electronic circuits is challenging and often limits the miniaturization of the entire system," said Kaner, who is also a professor of materials science and engineering at UCLA's Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science. "This is because the necessary energy-storage components scale down poorly in size and are not well suited to the planar geometries of most integrated fabrication processes." "Traditional methods for the fabrication of micro-supercapacitors involve labor-intensive lithographic techniques that have proven difficult for building cost-effective devices, thus limiting their commercial application," El-Kady said. "Instead, we used a consumer-grade LightScribe DVD burner to produce graphene micro-supercapacitors over large areas at a fraction of the cost of traditional devices. Using this technique, we have been able to produce more than 100 micro-supercapacitors on a single disc in less than 30 minutes, using inexpensive materials." The process of miniaturization often relies on flattening technology, making devices thinner and more like a geometric plane that has only two dimensions. In developing their new micro-supercapacitor, Kaner and El-Kady used a two-dimensional sheet of carbon, known as graphene, which only has the thickness of a single atom in the third dimension. Kaner and El-Kady took advantage of a new structural design during the fabrication. For any supercapacitor to be effective, two separated electrodes have to be positioned so that the available surface area between them is maximized. This allows the supercapacitor to store a greater charge. A previous design stacked the layers of graphene serving as electrodes, like the slices of bread on a sandwich. While this design was functional, however, it was not compatible with integrated circuits. In their new design, the researchers placed the electrodes side by side using an interdigitated pattern, akin to interwoven fingers. This helped to maximize the accessible surface area available for each of the two electrodes while also reducing the path over which ions in the electrolyte would need to diffuse. As a result, the new supercapacitors have more charge capacity and rate capability than their stacked counterparts. Interestingly, the researchers found that by placing more electrodes per unit area, they boosted the micro-supercapacitor's ability to store even more charge. Kaner and El-Kady were able to fabricate these intricate supercapacitors using an affordable and scalable technique that they had developed earlier. They glued a layer of plastic onto the surface of a DVD and then coated the plastic with a layer of graphite oxide. Then, they simply inserted the coated disc into a commercially available LightScribe optical drive — traditionally used to label DVDs — and took advantage of the drive's own laser to create the interdigitated pattern. The laser scribing is so precise that none of the "interwoven fingers" touch each other, which would short-circuit the supercapacitor. "To label discs using LightScribe, the surface of the disc is coated with a reactive dye that changes color on exposure to the laser light. Instead of printing on this specialized coating, our approach is to coat the disc with a film of graphite oxide, which then can be directly printed on," Kaner said. "We previously found an unusual photo-thermal effect in which graphite oxide absorbs the laser light and is converted into graphene in a similar fashion to the commercial LightScribe process. With the precision of the laser, the drive renders the computer-designed pattern onto the graphite oxide film to produce the desired graphene circuits." "The process is straightforward, cost-effective and can be done at home," El-Kady said. "One only needs a DVD burner and graphite oxide dispersion in water, which is commercially available at a moderate cost." The new micro-supercapacitors are also highly bendable and twistable, making them potentially useful as energy-storage devices in flexible electronics like roll-up displays and TVs, e-paper, and even wearable electronics. The researchers showed the utility of their new laser-scribed graphene micro-supercapacitor in an all-solid form, which would enable any new device incorporating them to be more easily shaped and flexible. The micro-supercapacitors can also be fabricated directly on a chip using the same technique, making them highly useful for integration into micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) or complementary metal-oxide-semiconductors (CMOS). These micro-supercapacitors show excellent cycling stability, an important advantage over micro-batteries, which have shorter lifespans and which could pose a major problem when embedded in permanent structures — such as biomedical implants, active radio-frequency identification tags and embedded micro-sensors — for which no maintenance or replacement is possible. As they can be directly integrated on-chip, these micro-supercapacitors may help to better extract energy from solar, mechanical and thermal sources and thus make more efficient self-powered systems. They could also be fabricated on the backside of solar cells in both portable devices and rooftop installations to store power generated during the day for use after sundown, helping to provide electricity around the clock when connection to the grid is not possible. "We are now looking for industry partners to help us mass-produce our graphene micro-supercapacitors," Kaner said.

http://newsroom.ucla.edu/portal/ucla/ucla-...que-243553.aspx



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All posters Please note, the decision to either buy or sell this share is entirely the individuals choice, I am not authorised to give investment advice, I post here to discuss the merits of technology as I see it, which may or may not be correct? and any information here is worth what you paid for it! the moose is loose
 
nebo
post Posted: Feb 25 2013, 05:33 AM
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In Reply To: moosey's post @ Feb 24 2013, 06:29 PM

Logged in from my lurking to say one thing.
Wow that will change the world as we know it behind the scenes, if they can commercialise.
Regards,
Nebo

 
moosey
post Posted: Feb 24 2013, 06:29 PM
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I hope they get this to work well, it will be huge for Solar I believe.

More Good News About The 'Scientific Accident That May Change The World'


by Chris Clarke on February 21, 2013 2:51 PM


Graphene supercapacitors | Photo: UCLA That battery life video that had gone viral due to a recent post on UpWorthy (and which we told you about Tuesday) now has an update.

We told you that researchers at Ric Kamen's lab at UCLA had found a way to make a non-toxic, highly efficient energy storage medium out of pure carbon using absurdly simple technology.

Today, we can report that the same team may well have found a way to make that process scale up to mass-production levels.

Related

What is Grid Storage?



Explained
: Understanding Distributed Generation The recap: Graphene, a very simple carbon polymer, can be used as the basic component of a "supercapacitor" -- an electrical power storage device that charges far more rapidly than chemical batteries.

Unlike other supercapacitors, though, graphene's structure also offers a high "energy density," -- it can hold a lot of electrons, meaning that it could conceivably rival or outperform batteries in the amount of charge it can hold.
Kaner Lab researcher Maher El-Kady found a way to create sheets of graphene a single carbon atom thick by covering a plastic surface with graphite oxide solution and bombarding it with precisely controlled laser light.

English translation: He painted a DVD with a liquid carbon solution and stuck it into a standard-issue DVD burner.

The result: Absurdly cheap graphene sheets one atom thick, which held a surprising amount of charge without further modification.

That work was reported a year ago; we mentioned it due to the video virally making the rounds this week.

Late Tuesday, UCLA announced that El-Kady and Kaner have a new article in press, in the upcoming issue of Nature Communications, describing a method by which El-Kady's earlier, slightly homebrewed fabricating process shown in the video can be made more efficient, raising the possibility of mass production.
As the authors say in their article abstract,

More than 100 micro-supercapacitors can be produced on a single disc in 30 min or less.

El-Kady and Kaner found a way to embed small electrodes within each graphene unit, and place the whole thing on a flexible substrate that allows the supercapacitor to be bent.

The team is already claiming energy density comparable to existing thin-film lithium ion batteries.

In the video we shared Tuesday, Kaner says that this technology, if it pans out, offers possibilities like a smart phone getting a full day's charge in a second or two, or an electric car reaching "full" in a minute.

This week's press release from UCLA offers other intriguing possibilities:

The new micro-supercapacitors are also highly bendable and twistable, making them potentially useful as energy-storage devices in flexible electronics like roll-up displays and TVs, e-paper, and even wearable electronics.

The researchers showed the utility of their new laser-scribed graphene micro-supercapacitor in an all-solid form, which would enable any new device incorporating them to be more easily shaped and flexible.

The micro-supercapacitors can also be fabricated directly on a chip using the same technique, making them highly useful for integration into micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) or complementary metal-oxide-semiconductors (CMOS).

As they can be directly integrated on-chip, these micro-supercapacitors may help to better extract energy from solar, mechanical and thermal sources and thus make more efficient self-powered systems.

They could also be fabricated on the backside of solar cells in both portable devices and rooftop installations to store power generated during the day for use after sundown, helping to provide electricity around the clock when connection to the grid is not possible.
Kaner says that his lab is now looking for partners in industry that can help make these graphene supercapacitors on an industrial scale.

It's tempting to be cynical about the possibility of a magic bullet energy storage solution; such a breakthrough could solve any number of problems from annoying dead smart phones to two-hour charge times for electric cars to an inefficient power distribution grid, and it's easy to really want this kind of thing to be true.

Plenty of seemingly promising technical innovations in the last few years haven't lived up to their hopeful hype. There's always the chance that further study will reveal a fatal flaw in graphene supercapacitor technology. But for the time being, ReWire officially has its hopes up, at least a little.

http://www.kcet.org/news/rewire/science/mo...capacitors.html



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All posters Please note, the decision to either buy or sell this share is entirely the individuals choice, I am not authorised to give investment advice, I post here to discuss the merits of technology as I see it, which may or may not be correct? and any information here is worth what you paid for it! the moose is loose

Said 'Thanks' for this post: wolverine  nebo  
 
moosey
post Posted: Feb 15 2013, 10:36 AM
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I have been mulling over why GE/GLE are taking so long to announce that they will start building the new plant, we already know they will from two sources now, but when is the burning question?

I think I may now have a better understanding as to why the delay, after reading this document, or should I say two documents, I don't totally believe GLE is looking at whether the new plant will be viable, sure they wouldn't build it if it isn't, but I believe there is another reason for the delay.

I read this document

http://www.wilmingtonbiz.com/industry_news...ils.php?id=4449

and after reading that, well it got me thinking (dangerous I know!)

What stood out in that document were several parts i.e.

"It's a cheaper, more efficient process of enriching uranium than the early technique of gaseous diffusion or the current method that uses centrifuges,"
To me that puts paid as to the economics of it let alone the national security issues IMHO.


But the most important part was this-:
"Even if GE does decide to break ground on the facility, it could take years before any significant development follows because thousands of acres surrounding the GE Hitachi facility lack the basic infrastructure needed for robust development: proper sewer capacity."

There are a number of things that need addressing, some of them being things like, Transport, Water and Sewerage, Storm Water, Schools, there will be 680 construction workers on site and currently,there are only two restaurants in Castle Hayne and the list goes on!
As you may see there are any number of things that are not directly related to the construction site directly but may impinge on it if they were not addressed, these external issues are very important and if some of them were not addressed? if god forbid something terrible happened at the plant,could lead to huge litigation down the track, if every effort was not made to address them before construction of the site even starts, GE would be absolutely NUTS if they do not address these issues first.

This thinking made me dig deeper on this, it led me to this PDF document, this document explains in detail some of the more important issues at hand I believe.


PDF http://www.nhcgov.com/PlanInspect/Document...inal%20Plan.pdf

It is called Castle Hayne Community Plan.

(Yes surprise surprise they already have a plan and it is being acted on right now.)

There is some very important info in this document, it has to be a primary reason why the plant construction hasn't started yet.

For instance, did you know that, the majority of Castle Hayne is not currently serviced by public water or sewer
facilities.

As a result, most of the residents in Castle Hayne depend on wells and septic tanks for their water and sewer needs?

That bit above in my opinion is the number one reason for the delay.

The second reason being-: Flooding and drainage issues are present throughout New Hanover County, and the Castle Hayne community is no different, now look at the diagram on page 32 of that PDF, look at the headwater of that small creek near chip road (bottom LH corner) it is by my estimates about 800 meters from GE look at this map

http://www.mapquest.com/maps?city=Castle%2...ne&state=NC

look for Hermitage road where it meets Castle Hayne Road, on the other side of CH rd opposite Hermitage road is approximately where GE lives, see how close that is to this headwater, also look at the Storm Water areas of concern oin the diagram on page 32 these two point in particular are important in my opinion for a number of reasons, 3. Castle Lakes Road at Prince George Creek 4. Castle Hayne Road at Prince George Creek.


You can see where I am going with this, it may be for instance better to monitor what is happening with the Castle Hayne Plan to get some sort of idea on the timing of the announcement that the full plant construction is about to happen.

NB. I tried uploading the PDF, probably too big? I also tried to paste the map on Page 32 again no luck, so you will just have to look for yourselves.



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All posters Please note, the decision to either buy or sell this share is entirely the individuals choice, I am not authorised to give investment advice, I post here to discuss the merits of technology as I see it, which may or may not be correct? and any information here is worth what you paid for it! the moose is loose

Said 'Thanks' for this post: gulf  grevillia  
 
 


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