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**New Member Introductions**, New members to introduce themselves
veeone
post Posted: May 6 2013, 10:43 AM
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In Reply To: mcart117's post @ Mar 19 2013, 05:00 PM

Welcome to SS.

QUOTE
I don't touch bio-tech or any new tech really because I don't understand it.


Probably more than 90% of the market is in the same boat.......but jump on any train thats pushing hot air and then the experts come out of the closet!! V1


Said 'Thanks' for this post: marketwinner  flower  
 
mcart117
post Posted: May 6 2013, 08:33 AM
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In Reply To: marketwinner's post @ May 5 2013, 09:57 PM

Welcome aboard, and thank you for your kind words.


Said 'Thanks' for this post: marketwinner  
 
flower
post Posted: May 5 2013, 11:55 PM
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In Reply To: marketwinner's post @ May 5 2013, 09:57 PM

QUOTE
My fundamental belief is that over the coming decades the spending power of ordinary people in Chine and India will grow to a point where every commodity required in the production process will become "precious


Many are calling today the ending of our mining boom, in the context of looking at the much bigger picture going forward decades think you are dead right, best summed up by one of the best orators ever heard during one of his famous WW2 speeches:

"Now this is not the end. It is not even the beginning of the end. But it is, perhaps, the end of the beginning."



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Combining Fundamental comments with Fundamental charts.

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marketwinner
post Posted: May 5 2013, 09:57 PM
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Hi mcart117

I like some of the facts in your post. I too believe both China and India will create demand for some commodities such as oil, coal, maize, wheat, salt, meat, coffee, milk, tea and few more commodities in the coming decade. Even other Asian and African countries such as Indonesia, Nigeria, Kenya, Vietnam, and Bangladesh also will create demand for lot of food and hot beverage based commodities, oil, alternative oils, coal, meat, tea, sugar and coffee etc in the coming decade. We should not forget these countries will have the largest population in the world in the coming two decades. Some western based countries including New Zealand and Australia will have bigger export market in Asia and Africa for their products such as meat including halal meat, wheat, maize, fertilizer, milk and other consumer items. At the moment Nestle is shining in both emerging and frontier world. More global companies will shine in these markets in the coming decade.


What I like most in your post are:

My fundamental belief is that over the coming decades the spending power of ordinary people in Chine and India will grow to a point where every commodity required in the production process will become "precious".

Hope to remain active, because writing a post, even like this one, helps to focus my mind, and reading the thoughts of others helps to keep my somewhat whacky mind on track.

Thanks and best regards

 
marketwinner
post Posted: May 5 2013, 09:37 PM
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In Reply To: mcart117's post @ Mar 19 2013, 05:00 PM

Dear All

I am new to this forum and I am based in New Zealand.Hope to contribute my knowledge in investment world while learning from experienced intelligent members here.


I like to tell you that I went through some of the discussions in this forum and I found they are valuable to anyone who wants to learn about stock market.

Thanks and Best regards


 
mcart117
post Posted: Mar 19 2013, 05:00 PM
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This is not my first post, but I thought I'd put something in this thread to provide a context for some of my other posts.

I work part time in IT and apart from a decade with London banks, and few years with a Perth chemical company always have. Most of my Perth IT clients were small mining companies.

The only reason I have ever had any money to invest is by liquidating the proceeds of property inflation by moving down the property ladder: from London to Perth in 1987 and from Perth to rural WA in 2002.

Dividends from solid, if boring, stocks represent a source of income for me, so I can only afford to play around at the margin. The idea of liquidating everything on speculation of a downturn (mentioned by Arty in the index thread) is quite alien to me, especially after investing months and years of "research time" in building up the portfolio I have, albeit with its share of dogs, as well as a few good performers.

The age old dilemma I face is that the best dividends are paid by the slow growers (and shrinkers!), while the best potential growth stocks either pay very low dividends or no dividends at all.

My fundamental belief is that over the coming decades the spending power of ordinary people in Chine and India will grow to a point where every commodity required in the production process will become "precious". I believe that at the same time the ups and downs of Europe and the US will become irrelevant or of only marginal interest.

My favorite growth stocks are therefore mining and exploration companies with long life resources. I believe in "peak oil" so I include oil producers and coal miners in that group. I don't like gold (although I have picked up a handful of stocks recently because I thought the market over did the discounting) but I do like platinum. I don't touch bio-tech or any new tech really because I don't understand it.

I used to favor the banks as income stocks, especially CBA, but after learning how much my mother lost in Lloyds Bank during the GFC (that's a story in itself if I could find somewhere to post it), I became nervous, and made no new investments there. During the last few weeks I have, with some misgivings, been selling these down. As a result, there is now a hole in my income, and a weakening of the link between my portfolio and the all ords. In other words, selling the bank shares has revealed that my beloved and "carefully researched" portfolio is not as crash hot as I thought it was.

My favorite combo stocks (growth and dividend) have been mining service companies like MND and CLO, and others I'd never heard of before buying so it was sheer blind luck that they went up, and a couple of small telcos like TPG and AMM. I've started selling these down because although I believe in the future of commodities, the service companies, to grow more, need ever more mines; whereas I envisage ever smaller mines producing ever less for higher and higher prices. And although the telcos have risen a lot, at the end of the day they are utilities, and will end up no more exciting than APA.

So that's me. Thank you for all the kind and helpful replies to my posts already.

I hope to remain active, because writing a post, even like this one, helps to focus my mind, and reading the thoughts of others helps to keep my somewhat whacky mind on track. smile.gif


Said 'Thanks' for this post: arty  crooky  marketwinner  veeone  
 


arty
post Posted: Sep 29 2011, 11:33 PM
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In Reply To: billcarson's post @ Sep 29 2011, 09:09 PM

G'Day Dave,

Welcome to ShareScene;

would you, by way of introduction, tell us a little more about you?
  • The Markets you trade
  • Your trading style: do you research individual companies, sectors, markets? Or do you include technical considerations?
  • How long have you been "in the Market"?
You will find we're a pretty cool bunch who tell how we see things frankly, sometimes bluntly.
But we're curious too to get to know new active members.



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I trade daily, but I am not a licensed adviser. Whether you find my ideas reasonable or not: The only person responsible for your actions is YOU.
I follow two rules: (1) There are no sacred truths. All assumptions must be critically examined. Arguments from authority are worthless. (2) Whatever is inconsistent with observed facts must be discarded or revised. We must understand the Market as it is and not confuse how it is with how we wish it to be. (inspired by Carl Sagan)

Said 'Thanks' for this post: marketwinner  
 
wolverine
post Posted: Sep 29 2011, 09:52 PM
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In Reply To: henrietta's post @ Sep 29 2011, 09:40 PM

x2



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I AM THE OTHER WHITE MEAT
 
henrietta
post Posted: Sep 29 2011, 09:40 PM
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In Reply To: billcarson's post @ Sep 29 2011, 09:09 PM

Welcome, Dave.

Cheers
J

 
billcarson
post Posted: Sep 29 2011, 09:09 PM
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Hi all,

Just wanted to say hi and that I'm looking forward to contributing to discussions here and becoming a part of the ShareScene community!

Dave



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My Money Calculator
Shares | Property | Super | Personal
 
 


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