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Internet Fraud, current scams to watch out for
Tinkerbell
post Posted: Jun 11 2014, 10:51 PM
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In Reply To: arty's post @ Jun 11 2014, 12:33 PM

G'day Arty,

Another giveaway is usually the URL they want you to follow. Hovering the mouse pointer (NOT CLICK) will show the real

URL, usually somewhere in Russia!





Said 'Thanks' for this post: grevillia  
 
arty
post Posted: Jun 11 2014, 12:33 PM
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The recent Heartbleed attack on eBay may have sparked some flow-on effect.
This morning, I received a genuine-looking confirmation email from PayPal, about payment for a purchase I (allegedly) made recently. It contained the usual link to the item I allegedly bought - except I know I didn't buy a cool puppy bed.

In case anyone receives a similar "dodgy" message, please be careful and don't click on any link:

The email differed in at least three key features that gave it away as being fake:

The salutation just said "Hello:" whereas PayPal will greet clients with their full name;
The paypal address, from which it was sent, has some extra characters in it;
Although it was sent to my correct email account, PayPal uses my client name as Alias; the fake didn't.

I forwarded the fake to spoof@ebay.com.au before deleting it from my Inbox; hope it helps them catch the barstuds.



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I trade daily, but I am not a licensed adviser. Whether you find my ideas reasonable or not: The only person responsible for your actions is YOU.
I follow two rules: (1) There are no sacred truths. All assumptions must be critically examined. Arguments from authority are worthless. (2) Whatever is inconsistent with observed facts must be discarded or revised. We must understand the Market as it is and not confuse how it is with how we wish it to be. (inspired by Carl Sagan)

Said 'Thanks' for this post: grevillia  
 
flower
post Posted: May 13 2013, 09:59 AM
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In Reply To: Duster's post @ Oct 2 2012, 01:52 PM

Duster--I got a strange call from an Indian gentleman muttering something unintelligible about helping me with my Telstra home phone account which was I thought somewhat odd since I don't have a Telstra home phone account so told him to .... off.

Remember arty think it was saying that big organisations simply don't ring/email you out of the blue so its a toss up as to who one tells to ....off!



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Combining Fundamental comments with Fundamental charts.
 
arty
post Posted: May 13 2013, 09:35 AM
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I've seen lots of fake emails from financial institutions, the Tax Office, even telcos.
This is a new one and warrants a reminder IMHO. Looks authentic enough, but you can bet your bottom Dollar it's a fraud. I know because I don't have a NAB account.

QUOTE
Dear Member,

We have recently noticed many attacks to our database and this
requires us to rebuild our system integrity. We regularly screen our
members account information to reduce FRAUD & ID Theft.

This security measure is intended to help protect our NAB(National Australia Bank) members
and their accounts. We are sorry for any inconvenience. However, failure in
reviewing and updating your account information will result in your account suspension.
You are requested to visit our website and fill in the required information.


To continue click here, and follow the steps.


Please do not reply to this message. For any inquiries, contact Member Services.

Copyright 2013 NAB Banking Corporation ABN 33 007 457 141 AFSL and Australian credit licence 233714.. All rights reserved.
I have a similar one forwarded to NAB's hoax line. Seems the crims won't give up.



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I trade daily, but I am not a licensed adviser. Whether you find my ideas reasonable or not: The only person responsible for your actions is YOU.
I follow two rules: (1) There are no sacred truths. All assumptions must be critically examined. Arguments from authority are worthless. (2) Whatever is inconsistent with observed facts must be discarded or revised. We must understand the Market as it is and not confuse how it is with how we wish it to be. (inspired by Carl Sagan)
 
Financial Chatte...
post Posted: Oct 2 2012, 05:34 PM
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I also suspect that the email supposedly from Woolworths asking us to participate in a survey is a phishing exercise

 
arty
post Posted: Oct 2 2012, 02:11 PM
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In Reply To: Duster's post @ Oct 2 2012, 01:52 PM

The Telstra email doesn't bother me - anything from Telstra goes straight into the bin because I don't have an account with Telstra.

But similar emails are being circulated from (spoofed) look-alikes of ebay, paypal, and several others.
They seem to be mailed in batches to a variety of emaill addresses. On some days, I receive the same "advice" sent to two or three different addresses - preferably to ones that I give out to news services or have made up for entering a competition.

So, if an email arrives from "ebay" to anywhere but the ebay account, I don't even open it.



--------------------
I trade daily, but I am not a licensed adviser. Whether you find my ideas reasonable or not: The only person responsible for your actions is YOU.
I follow two rules: (1) There are no sacred truths. All assumptions must be critically examined. Arguments from authority are worthless. (2) Whatever is inconsistent with observed facts must be discarded or revised. We must understand the Market as it is and not confuse how it is with how we wish it to be. (inspired by Carl Sagan)
 


Duster
post Posted: Oct 2 2012, 01:52 PM
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WARNING: An email scam is doing the rounds at present. The email purports to come from Telstra, with the subject line reading, "Telstra Online Your Account Balance".

The body of the email reads, "PLEASE CHECK YOUR ACCOUNT BALANCE IN ATTACHED FILE".

Attached is a ZIP file which is a compressed file containing almost any type of file the sender wishes to place in it.

In this case it's almost certainly a virus.

DO NOT open the file; DELETE IT IMMEDIATELY (and then delete it from your Recycle Bin to be safe).



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Patience is the key to success.

Said 'Thanks' for this post: arty  
 
PeterH
post Posted: Oct 30 2011, 02:17 PM
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In Reply To: arty's post @ Oct 29 2011, 09:40 PM

I see your point Arty, but perhaps you are not aware that plenty of internet vendors who send goods by parcel post, courier or a combination of post and courier, often via the Netherlands for some odd reason, although it must have something to do with cost, do have the recipient's email address. Who is to know how they might display it or make it known to a carrier.

 
Gum Nut
post Posted: Oct 30 2011, 02:16 AM
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In Reply To: arty's post @ Oct 29 2011, 09:40 PM

hi Arty et al,

Sometimes those emails may seem quite authentic and difficult to identify as fraud. In those situations, I have called relevant service centre directly, be it, bank,university or whatever institution. In ALL instances, the emails re acct details were FRAUDULENT. As a routine, I now forward the email enquiry to relevant service centre - after making direct contact with human - for verification. This has saved both money and anxiety.

Also, frequently scan hard disk for any form of unwanted addition to your software - generally, if you did not put it there then you are probably better off with its removal.

GN


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arty
post Posted: Oct 29 2011, 09:40 PM
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In Reply To: PeterH's post @ Oct 29 2011, 02:47 PM

But wouldn't alarm lights flare up immediately if someone got an email from Australia Post? How do they know my email address?
The Postie doesn't bother with the name, he only stuffs the letter into the letterbox that has the right number - sometimes that's even the only match with street name or suburb different.
So, how come they know my email address? Hellooo? Anybody at home?

But I was shocked today when a friend told me about their laptop tanking; everytime on bootup, there is a message saying there are seven Trojans on the computer. "What's a Trojan?"
When I explained what it is and how dangerous it could be, the answer came "Ohh, so could that explain why I find these funny charges on my Visa Card? Every few weeks, it's sometimes $37, or $58, and always from a company in Sydney I don't know." When I suggested call the Bank and ask for details, maybe even reverse those charges, I got the reply "Oh, I don't know. It's all so complicated and I don't think I want to deal with it right now."



--------------------
I trade daily, but I am not a licensed adviser. Whether you find my ideas reasonable or not: The only person responsible for your actions is YOU.
I follow two rules: (1) There are no sacred truths. All assumptions must be critically examined. Arguments from authority are worthless. (2) Whatever is inconsistent with observed facts must be discarded or revised. We must understand the Market as it is and not confuse how it is with how we wish it to be. (inspired by Carl Sagan)

Said 'Thanks' for this post: grevillia  
 
 


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