Logo
Registered Members Login:
   
Forgotten Your Details? Click Here To Recover +
Welcome to ShareScene - Talk Shares And Take Stock With Australia's Sharemarket Community - New Here? Click To Register >

3 Pages (Click to Jump) V   1 2 3 >   
 
  
Reply to this topic

Solar Panel Installers, Who have you used? Traps for young players?
nebo
post Posted: Jul 18 2011, 07:04 PM
  Quote Post


Posts: 120
Thanks: 28


In Reply To: walbrook's post @ Jul 7 2011, 08:24 AM

I actually just read this piece from a couple of months ago in Climate Speculator.

Was reading Dyesol stuff and the battery popped up.

I have some more reading it seems hehe.



Redflow, the ASX-listed electricity storage system company says it has secured a major supply contract for its energy storage sytems through the federal government’s Smart Grid, Smart City initiative. Redflow says it will supply and install 60 of its R510 units with Ausgrid, Australia‟s largest electrical distribution utility, for the project in Newcastle, Scone and Sydney. The units will store electricity to distribute power into the grid at peak usage times.

RedFlow says the contract will bring RedFlow‟s current order book to a record level of more than $3 million. “The new R510 installations will put RedFlow‟s energy storage systems on the world stage when it comes to Smart Grid technologies which will eventually be rolled-out globally," CEO Phil Hutchings said in a statement. “This Ausgrid contract win provides further evidence that our systems are being well received by the market due to their quality, reliability, and efficiency in maximising energy storage.”

Ausgrid smart grid manager Adrian Clark said the RedFlow units would form the first energy storage facet of the project. The RedFlow units will be used to create a micro-grid near Scone to power part of the community independently of the grid during maintenance or power outages. Other trials will involve using the energy storage systems to test drawing power from the grid in off peak times and sending it back during peaks. The RedFlow R510 units include a standard RedFlow 5kW/10 kWh zinc-bromine flow battery module, an inverter, remote control and communication systems.



 
jogreen
post Posted: Jul 8 2011, 06:41 AM
  Quote Post


Posts: 21
Thanks: 2


In Reply To: hoaky's post @ Jul 7 2011, 10:44 PM

THANKS HOAKY AND WALBROOK FOR REPLIES................re CSIRO Ultra Battery.

(Not Redox batteries ZnBr or V )... Pb acid with a twist.

cheers



 
hoaky
post Posted: Jul 7 2011, 10:44 PM
  Quote Post


Posts: 411
Thanks: 83


In Reply To: jogreen's post @ Jul 7 2011, 01:37 AM

ultrabattery. Lead/acid with some capacitor thing?
Attached File  ultrabattery.JPG ( 57.52K ) Number of downloads: 4

was your interest related to competition to lithium?
seems to have been around for a bit. found this from 2008 by Peter Coppin - Using intelligent storage to smooth intermittent wind energy generation

http://www.feast.org/roundtable2008/presentations/2.6_Coppin.pdf

 
walbrook
post Posted: Jul 7 2011, 08:24 AM
  Quote Post


Posts: 258
Thanks: 45


In Reply To: jogreen's post @ Jul 7 2011, 01:37 AM

Hi Nebo,I'm not sure what they called it but "super battery" was probably my label, however they did say that they were using conventional lead acid technology,the equipment to manage the system was what they were trialing, sorry I can't give a better report as I couldn't give the show my full attention as I was distracted at the time.

 
nebo
post Posted: Jul 7 2011, 06:18 AM
  Quote Post


Posts: 120
Thanks: 28


In Reply To: arty's post @ Jul 6 2011, 11:38 PM

I'm glad of that Arty,
Sydney types have higher propensity to consume more of everything hehe.
Most dont realise what their consumption is and what the units will actually do.
In NSW as of April all new installations are of the 'NETT' type.
That is you use the power in your house before it registers onto the grid.
The excess units they dont get paid for.
So those that got in early are truly lucky.
The real can of worms will occur when they stop paying the "gross " customers, which big barry tried and failed just this last month.
.....
AHH yes for some interesting reading and an insight as to how broke NSW is.
Pick up one of the Annual reports of the state corporations hehe.
They borrow money to give the gov for dividends.
(the REAL reason for privatisation and power price rises).
try doing that in a private or listed situation.
Regards,
Nebo

 
jogreen
post Posted: Jul 7 2011, 01:37 AM
  Quote Post


Posts: 21
Thanks: 2


In Reply To: walbrook's post @ Jul 6 2011, 09:13 PM

Walbrook,

do you know what ttpe of battery the CSIRO super battery was ie material compounds used ??????????

am presently overseas

 


arty
post Posted: Jul 6 2011, 11:38 PM
  Quote Post


Posts: 11,714
Thanks: 2791


In Reply To: walbrook's post @ Jul 6 2011, 09:13 PM

Hi Walbrook
Lucky you in NSW wink.gif
As we were among the first wave to take up the subsidy offer, our entry price was higher: we paid $8K for 2KW.
The first year feed-in tariff was zero, and only since last September will the WA Gov'mint subsidise the excess feed-in to the tunr of 40c, plus 7c wholsesale price from Western Power/ Synergy. That applies for ten years, but only for existing PV systems.
(Thanks to the better than expected uptake, the feed-in tariff has been reduced to 20c for new installations and will completely drop off, once the total capacity reaches a certain threshold - from memory, it's 150MW.)

In our situation, I estimate the current mix of fed in and self-consumed (i.e. saved) power at around 30c. Multiplied by our annual production of about 3,500 units, that equates to a saving of a little over $1,000 p.a. which gave me the 7 years mentioned earlier.

Our household used to consume over 20 units on an average day; thanks to several other measures - not just "switching off at the socket", but also replacing all my old CRT monnitors by LCD ones - we're down to about half that.
But then, we don't have any teenagers, so there's no multiple noise boxes/ stereos running incessantly. Heavenly quiet! hypocrite.gif



--------------------
I trade daily, but I am not a licensed adviser. Whether you find my ideas reasonable or not: The only person responsible for your actions is YOU.
I follow two rules: (1) There are no sacred truths. All assumptions must be critically examined. Arguments from authority are worthless. (2) Whatever is inconsistent with observed facts must be discarded or revised. We must understand the Market as it is and not confuse how it is with how we wish it to be. (inspired by Carl Sagan)
 
walbrook
post Posted: Jul 6 2011, 09:13 PM
  Quote Post


Posts: 258
Thanks: 45


In Reply To: arty's post @ Jul 6 2011, 12:57 PM

Hi arty, we had a 3.2 kw system installed last December which cost $8,000.00.
For the first six months we have produced 2250kw and sold this into the grid T $0.68/kw.
given a similar amount of Sun for the next six months we should producearound 4500kw for the year
So the system should pay for itself in three years.
Our household uses around 6500kw/year so we really need a 5kw system to be self sufficient.
The agreement with the NSW govt. where they pay us $0.68/kwh finishes in 2016 at which point they expect
the cost of electricity to be around $0.60/kw., we may add some more capacity at this point but if we add more panels before then we break the contract.
Last night on ABC TV there was a report showing a new type of super battery invented by the CSIRO and being trialed at a wind turbine at Hampton(near Oberon) which evens out the supply to the grid from the turbine.
Power from the turbine to the grid varies with wind speed, this(battery) has the effect of leveling it out making it more grid friendly.
I feel it would make sense if this type of unit could be used in town as well to level out production from roof top solar units.
I understand that electricty distributers don't like solar panels as the production makes the grid hard to manage as lots of power hits the grid and drops out without warning as clouds pass overhead.

 
arty
post Posted: Jul 6 2011, 12:57 PM
  Quote Post


Posts: 11,714
Thanks: 2791


In Reply To: veeone's post @ Jul 6 2011, 11:41 AM

Hi V1,
Based on today's power rates, the investment will pay off in about 7 years. But as power costs go up, I expect the time to decrease markedly - probably towards 5 years.
Our old hot water system, which we also replaced by the gravity-only Solargain tank, had been an electric "instant" Rheem. As that was chucked out only a short while before the first Solar Panels went in, I can't allot the combined savings to each separately. Using a broad thumb and pcp power bills, I guess the hot water accounted for about 25-30% of our pre-Solar consumption.

PS for nebo: It depends on the size of your house and family. Since our kids have their own families far away, my wife and I live in a small unit and 2KW just about covers it; some neighbours are on their own and get bi-monthly credits from only 1.5KW units. It does help though that our rooves are pretty much Nort-oriented.



--------------------
I trade daily, but I am not a licensed adviser. Whether you find my ideas reasonable or not: The only person responsible for your actions is YOU.
I follow two rules: (1) There are no sacred truths. All assumptions must be critically examined. Arguments from authority are worthless. (2) Whatever is inconsistent with observed facts must be discarded or revised. We must understand the Market as it is and not confuse how it is with how we wish it to be. (inspired by Carl Sagan)
 
veeone
post Posted: Jul 6 2011, 11:41 AM
  Quote Post


Posts: 4,972
Thanks: 1109


In Reply To: arty's post @ Jul 6 2011, 10:50 AM

Sounds good Arty. Approx how long for the system to pay for itself??
We have had solar water since late 70's the first system lasted 20 years before a panel started to leak due to sludge buildup at the bottom corroding a join. Should have been flushed more often!!
Fellow bought it to use on a gravity system as little to no pressure and as far as i know is still going!! V1

 
 


3 Pages (Click to Jump) V   1 2 3 >

Back To Top Of Page
Reply to this topic


You agree through the use of ShareScene.com, that you understand and accept the TERMS OF USE.


TERMS OF USE  -  CONTACT ADMIN  -  ADVERTISING