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NEWS PAPER OR MEDIA ARTICLES, ANYTHING INTERESTING
mullokintyre
post Posted: Jan 11 2015, 09:57 AM
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In Reply To: alonso's post @ Jan 9 2015, 09:44 AM

Would probably be more relevant if it was based on Australian prices, but interesting nonetheless.
As a male, I don't shop on price.
I buy something if its needed , not because its the cheapest.

Mick



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alonso
post Posted: Jan 9 2015, 09:44 AM
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The challenge that seems will inevitably face Woolworths & Coles - and their 100,000+ employees. The question is, do they have a plan?


Which supermarket wins the shopping basket price test? Budget stores strike a blow against the giants as Aldi proves £1.87 cheaper than closest rival Asda
  • Aldi came out cheapest in a comparison of the seven big supermarkets
  • Compared a grocery basket of 15 items such as milk, eggs and bread
  • At Aldi it cost £14.75- £6.83 cheaper than Ocado and £1.87 less than Asda
  • Follows a pledge by Asda and Sainsbury's to make £450million price cuts
By Hannah Parry For Mailonline

Published: 03:45 EST, 9 January 2015 | Updated: 06:50 EST, 9 January 2015





Budget retailer Aldi has won yet another supermarket battle after it was revealed to have the cheapest typical shopping basket.

A snapshot of a 15-item groceries in the UK today has revealed a £6.83 difference between the cheapest and the most expensive supermarket.

Aldi offered up the best deal at £14.75, at £1.87 less than its closest rival Asda, according to the comparison made using the mysupermarket.co.uk website.

The boost for the budget supermarket follows the launch of supermarket price war this week after Asda and Sainsbury's announced £450million in price cuts to stop millions of customers leaving for Aldi and Lidl.

Tesco's basket came in at £17.87 followed by Waitrose (£18.82), Morrisons (£20.10), Sainsbury's (£20.21) and Ocado (£21.58). A selection of 15 standard grocery items such as milk, eggs, sliced bread, bananas and fish fingers were compared using Aldi as the baseline retailer.

This resulted in every one of the 15 items being included from Aldi, but the final tally showed Asda, Tesco, Morrisons and Ocado had two missing items and Waitrose and Sainsbury's had one missing item. <H3 class=wocc>A TYPICAL BRITISH GROCERY BASKET </H3>4 pints of semi-skimmed milk

6 large free range eggs

1 loaf of Kingsmill 50/50 medium sliced

1 pack of large vine-ripened tomatoes

350g of medium cheddar cheese

250g salted butter

1 bunch of organic fairtrade bananas

4 x 125g Optifit fat free yoghurt

900g frozen peas

10 pack of fish fingers

1 whole fresh broccoli

500g of penne pasta

500ml of washing up liquid

500ml of antibacterial handwash

9 toilet rolls

The figures follow Asda, Tesco and Sainsbury's announcing major investments in price cutting this week alone, while Morrisons has claimed an industry first by promising to match the discounters on price.

Tesco, Asda, Sainsbury's and Ocado all have price comparison schemes which gives shoppers money back vouchers if they could have bought their basket for less elsewhere.

But Aldi has never made any such pledge, instead focusing on expanding its product lines and catering for increasingly middle-class tastes, stocking everything from lobster to jodhpurs and skiwear.



The UK supermarket sector has undergone tumultuous change in the last two years, with little in the way of good news for the middle-market Big Four.

Tesco, Asda, Sainsbury's and Morrisons have lost market share for the first time in a generation as customers depart in their droves for discounters Aldi and Lidl and the upmarket Waitrose and Marks & Spencer.

Gilad Simhony, chief executive of comparison website mysupermarket.co.uk, said middle-market supermarkets had struggled with the challenge of finding their niche while trying to offer low prices and quality.

He said: 'The supermarket industry has definitely become more competitive over the last couple of years.

'The response from many of the supermarkets has been to tighten their brand proposition and be more precise in their offering.'Supermarkets such as Aldi and to a certain extent Asda have focused on being the best value and cheapest products. On the other scale, retailers such as Waitrose have focused on quality.

<H3 class=wocc>BIG FOUR ARE LOSING MARKET SHARE TO SMALLER RIVALS</H3>Tesco DOWN 2.7%

Morrisons’ DOWN 3.2%

Sainsbury’s DOWN 1.8%

Asda DOWN 1%

Waitrose UP 6%

Aldi UP 22.3%

Lidl UP 18.3%

Source: Kantar Worldpanel *12 weeks to December 7

'Those supermarkets in the middle have struggled more as they overcome the challenge of providing the lowest prices but the highest quality.

'Over the next 12 months we would expect retailers to sharpen their brand positioning as the competition to retain loyalty becomes even harder.'

Aldi and Lidl have continued to attract increasing amounts of shoppers, albeit at a slower rate, suggesting that fierce price cutting by rivals may be beginning to have an effect.



Giles Hurley, joint managing director of corporate buying at Aldi, said the company was unconcerned about 'temporary price reductions from other retailers'.

'As a discounter, we will never be beaten on price and it is consistent everyday low pricing that is driving Aldi's success.'












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"The optimist proclaims that we live in the best of all possible worlds. The pessimist fears this is true"

"What is prudence in the conduct of every private family can scarce be folly in that of a great kingdom." Adam Smith
 
wren
post Posted: Jan 8 2015, 05:21 PM
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In Reply To: nipper's post @ Jan 8 2015, 03:51 PM

Most interesting....thanks.Surprised that such a major breakthrough came from a country populated by complete fools!

 
nipper
post Posted: Jan 8 2015, 03:51 PM
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Scientists hail teixobactin, first new antibiotic found in 25 years
  • Tom Whipple
  • The Times
  • January 08, 2015 2:52PM
QUOTE
SCIENTISTS hailed a potentially huge advance against antibiotic resistance yesterday, with the development of what could be the first new class of antibiotics in 25 years.

If approved for use in humans, teixobactin promises to combat pathogens that are resistant to today's antibiotics. Equally importantly, the way teixobactin was discovered opens up a mechanism by which scientists can search for other antibiotics.

The discovery, published in the journal Nature, comes after David Cameron warned that the world could be "cast back into the dark ages of medicine" unless action was taken to combat growing resistance to antibiotics.

Teixobactin is not able to kill some common bacteria, such as E.coli. However, experiments on mice showed that it could tackle pathogens such as the "superbug" MRSA and tuberculosis that have proved increasingly hard or impossible to destroy.

The laboratory of Kim Lewis, from Northeastern University in Boston, Massachusetts, is one of many around the world trying to develop antibiotics. Last autumn scientists at Massachusetts Institute of Technology announced promising results from engineering compounds to attack the precise genes in the target pathogens. Professor Lewis took a more conventional approach, by recognising that many of the potential antibiotics produced by nature have been unavailable to science.

"Most antibiotics we currently have have been isolated from soil microorganisms. Only about 1 per cent of environmental microorganisms will grow on Petri dishes in the lab." He and his colleagues created a method for growing the other 99 per cent, by sandwiching them between permeable membranes that are then buried in the soil. "We're tricking the bacteria; they don't know this is happening to them. They start growing and form colonies. Once that happens they can grow on a Petri dish."

Using this technique his laboratory analysed 10,000 cultures. Among them 25 other new antibiotics were found, but teixobactin was deemed the most promising. Scientists are particularly excited by the fact that teixobactin acts on a fundamental part of the bacteria. This means that it will be far harder for those bacteria to mutate and become resistant to it.

Other scientists welcomed the news. Mark Woolhouse, of the University of Edinburgh, said: "Any report of a new antibiotic is auspicious, but what most excites me is the tantalising prospect that this is just the tip of the iceberg."

The Times



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time."
- Dr John Hussman

Said 'Thanks' for this post: early birds  
 
nipper
post Posted: Jan 4 2015, 12:39 PM
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a semi-interesting list of best and worst investments from a bunch of US names (the sort of lists that appear at the silly season, end of year and quiet news-days): this one I like for both the lesson (that needs repeating) and the sense of schadenfreude received from someone I can only be repelled from, a pin-up boy of the worst excesses of USA

Listing life's best (and worst) investments
  • From: The Wall Street Journal

QUOTE
Jim Cramer, host of CNBC's Mad Money and a former hedge-fund manager:

Memorex Telex was by far the worst investment I have ever made. This computer-storage company had a terrific business but way too much debt. So in 1992 they filed a prepackaged bankruptcy that wiped out the stockholders.

I waited for the bondholders who got stock in the bankruptcy to sell it. I bought several hundred thousand shares at $US2 when it started trading. It almost immediately dropped to $US1.50, where I bought another couple of hundred thousand. In a few months the stock dropped to $US1. At $US1, I figured how much could I lose, so I bought another million shares. Next thing I know it's at US62.5c. I figured how much can you lose at 5/8ths of a dollar? So I doubled down again. Two million shares owned at 5/8ths of a dollar.

Sure enough, not only did Memorex Telex become one of the fastest companies ever to get through the bankruptcy process, it also became one of the fastest to go back into bankruptcy. How much could I lose? How about everything?

When you have a low-priced stock, don't think to yourself, "How much more can I lose?" You can still lose everything from a lower dollar level

http://www.theaustralian.com.au/business/w...k-1227172931860



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time."
- Dr John Hussman

Said 'Thanks' for this post: Alethia  
 
alonso
post Posted: Dec 19 2014, 09:26 AM
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In Reply To: mullokintyre's post @ Dec 19 2014, 05:46 AM

mullokintyre, I bet Franz Kafka would have loved the EU bureaucracy and judiciary.



--------------------
"The optimist proclaims that we live in the best of all possible worlds. The pessimist fears this is true"

"What is prudence in the conduct of every private family can scarce be folly in that of a great kingdom." Adam Smith
 


triage
post Posted: Dec 19 2014, 07:24 AM
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Here's some lightish reading for the festive season ...

http://longform.org/lists/best-of-2014



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"The market can stay irrational longer than you can stay solvent." John Maynard Keynes

"The crisis takes a much longer time coming than you think, and then it happens much faster than you would have thought." Rudiger Dornbush

"It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it." Aristotle

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mullokintyre
post Posted: Dec 19 2014, 05:46 AM
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From ABC NEWS

QUOTE
The European Union's highest court has ruled that obesity can be considered a "disability" if it hinders the overweight person's performance at work.

The European Court of Justice had been asked by a Danish court to consider the case of a child minder in Denmark who said he was fired four years ago because he is obese.

The employee, Karsten Kaltoft, filed a suit to obtain damages and interests from the municipality of Billund who employed him as a child minder, claiming he was the victim of discrimination.

The Danish court asked the Luxembourg court whether EU law itself prohibits discrimination on grounds of obesity and whether obesity can be considered a disability.

The EU court ruled that "no general principle of EU law prohibits, in itself, the discrimination on grounds of obesity".


I wonder how long it will take the Judiciary or quasi judiciary to determine the same here??
Watch the NDIS costs blow out then!!

Mick




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sent from my Olivetti Typewriter.
 
nipper
post Posted: Dec 18 2014, 12:09 PM
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In Reply To: chiller's post @ Dec 18 2014, 09:11 AM

loved the wit, who commented in these very columns .... when noticing Australia had produced 12,000 graduate lawyers last year , the response was "I didn't think we produced that many cars!!"

a sad reflection on the nation's perverse priorities



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time."
- Dr John Hussman
 
chiller
post Posted: Dec 18 2014, 09:11 AM
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In Reply To: mullokintyre's post @ Dec 18 2014, 08:00 AM

QUOTE
Now, if we can just cut down on the number of arts students. Noticed that the ATAR score to get into Melbourne Uni to do arts this year was 92.35. And about 2800 students want to do it.


Come on Mick that's a bit unfair. We need articulate baristas.

Cheers Charles



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Temporary insanity only
 
 


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