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NEWS PAPER OR MEDIA ARTICLES, ANYTHING INTERESTING
alonso
post Posted: Dec 19 2014, 09:26 AM
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In Reply To: mullokintyre's post @ Dec 19 2014, 05:46 AM

mullokintyre, I bet Franz Kafka would have loved the EU bureaucracy and judiciary.



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"The optimist proclaims that we live in the best of all possible worlds. The pessimist fears this is true"

"What is prudence in the conduct of every private family can scarce be folly in that of a great kingdom." Adam Smith
 
triage
post Posted: Dec 19 2014, 07:24 AM
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Here's some lightish reading for the festive season ...

http://longform.org/lists/best-of-2014



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"The market can stay irrational longer than you can stay solvent." John Maynard Keynes

"The crisis takes a much longer time coming than you think, and then it happens much faster than you would have thought." Rudiger Dornbush

"It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it." Aristotle

Said 'Thanks' for this post: Alethia  
 
mullokintyre
post Posted: Dec 19 2014, 05:46 AM
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From ABC NEWS

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The European Union's highest court has ruled that obesity can be considered a "disability" if it hinders the overweight person's performance at work.

The European Court of Justice had been asked by a Danish court to consider the case of a child minder in Denmark who said he was fired four years ago because he is obese.

The employee, Karsten Kaltoft, filed a suit to obtain damages and interests from the municipality of Billund who employed him as a child minder, claiming he was the victim of discrimination.

The Danish court asked the Luxembourg court whether EU law itself prohibits discrimination on grounds of obesity and whether obesity can be considered a disability.

The EU court ruled that "no general principle of EU law prohibits, in itself, the discrimination on grounds of obesity".


I wonder how long it will take the Judiciary or quasi judiciary to determine the same here??
Watch the NDIS costs blow out then!!

Mick




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nipper
post Posted: Dec 18 2014, 12:09 PM
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In Reply To: chiller's post @ Dec 18 2014, 09:11 AM

loved the wit, who commented in these very columns .... when noticing Australia had produced 12,000 graduate lawyers last year , the response was "I didn't think we produced that many cars!!"

a sad reflection on the nation's perverse priorities



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time."
- Dr John Hussman
 
chiller
post Posted: Dec 18 2014, 09:11 AM
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In Reply To: mullokintyre's post @ Dec 18 2014, 08:00 AM

QUOTE
Now, if we can just cut down on the number of arts students. Noticed that the ATAR score to get into Melbourne Uni to do arts this year was 92.35. And about 2800 students want to do it.


Come on Mick that's a bit unfair. We need articulate baristas.

Cheers Charles



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mullokintyre
post Posted: Dec 18 2014, 08:00 AM
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It seems that the US has finally worked out we have enough lawyers already.
From Bloombergs

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First-year law school enrollment in the U.S. fell 4.4 percent from a year ago to the lowest level in 41 years, amid a tighter job market and rising tuition.

The number of first-year students has slid 28 percent to 37,924 from an all-time high in 2010, according to a report by the American Bar Association.


Now, if we can just cut down on the number of arts students. Noticed that the ATAR score to get into Melbourne Uni to do arts this year was 92.35.
And about 2800 students want to do it.

Mick



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alonso
post Posted: Dec 16 2014, 02:42 PM
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In Reply To: mullokintyre's post @ Dec 16 2014, 02:28 PM

I have been wondering the same thing. The law works in mysterious ways its wonders to perform.



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"The optimist proclaims that we live in the best of all possible worlds. The pessimist fears this is true"

"What is prudence in the conduct of every private family can scarce be folly in that of a great kingdom." Adam Smith
 
mullokintyre
post Posted: Dec 16 2014, 02:28 PM
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In reading some of the myriad of articles about the siege in Sydney, I came accross the following from ABC.
It seems thatMan Monis was able to take his case all the way to the High Court.

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The judge who eventually sentenced him to 300 hours' community service and a two-year good behaviour bond for the offences described them as deplorable.

Monis pursued the matter all the way to the High Court arguing the case against him was "political" and "unconstitutional".

Last Friday the High Court threw his last attempt at an appeal out.


Amongst the many learned people who frequent this site,
is there anyone who know/understands on what grounds the High Court deems a particular case is worthy of being appealed??
According to the Judicial College of Victoria,
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An applicant may only appeal to the High Court if granted special leave to appeal. There is no appeal as of right.

When considering whether to grant special leave, the High Court will consider the following matters, along with any other matters it considers relevant:

whether the proceedings involve a question of law that is of public importance,
whether a decision of the High Court, as the final appellate court, is required in order to resolve differences of opinion between different courts, or within a court, concerning the state of the law,
whether the interests of the administration of justice require the High Court to consider the case.
See section 35A of the Judiciary Act 1903 (Cth).

The High Court has consistently stated that it is not a court of criminal appeal.

The High Court will not entertain an appeal in a criminal matter unless some point of general importance is involved which, if wrongly decided, might seriously interfere with the administration of justice.


Given the huge number of trials that take place in OZ, I was trying to work out on what grounds this lunatic was allowed to get as far as he did.

I have to admit, I struggled.
For such a minor matter, it seems ridiculous. He was sentence to 300 hours community service.and a good behaviour bond.


Mick



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mullokintyre
post Posted: Dec 16 2014, 11:22 AM
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One of my fav Authors, Michael Lewis has written a sort of Christmas wish list that was quoted in Chick Butlers daily Pfenning:


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This is Michael Lewis on Bloomberg. "Eight Things I Wish For Finance That Won't Happen:"


"1. The financial sector rids itself of anyone with even the faintest reason to believe that he or she is unusually clever. All those that scored highly on standardized tests, or been invited to join Mensa, or finished in the top quartile of any graduating class will be banned.

2. No person under the age of 35 will be allowed to work on Wall Street. Upon leaving school, young people, no matter how persuasively dimwitted, will be required to earn their living in the so-called real economy. If and when they turn 35, and still want to work in finance, they will carry with them memories of ordinary market forces, and perhaps be grateful to our society for having created an industry that is not subjected to them.

3. Women will henceforth make all Wall Street trading decisions. Men are more prone to financial risk-taking, and overconfidence.

4. Wall Street will take the resources it once hurled at Harvard and Yale, to recruit their students, and invest in America's leading retirement communities, to recruit their swelling population of elderly women, most of whom are currently wasting valuable trading hours!

5. No firm shall be immortal - or rather, no firm shall be too big to fail.

6. Strive to make the rest of society feel as if finance is something everyone can and should understand, by making it easily understandable.

7. All new American financial inventions, before they are inflicted on the American economy, will first be tested upon foreigners. The French would be ideal for this job. But if the French won't try our new stuff before we do, we can always bribe the Greeks to do it.

8. Channel America's testosterone into financial regulation. Of course, our new financial system will probably be so well behaved that it will not require further regulation. But as a safeguard, the Securities & Exchange Commission will need to be dismantled, and rebuilt as a for-profit enterprise. So that it might be at once feared and loathed, the regulator will be named Goldman Sachs, who will be paid a finder's fee, by the government, for every old lady it discovers in the act of a financial crime.


Pretty much sums it all up..

Mick



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mullokintyre
post Posted: Dec 15 2014, 10:59 AM
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From the ABC

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A County Court judge has found former federal MP Craig Thomson not guilty of 49 charges of misappropriating Health Services Union (HSU) funds but guilty of more than a dozen theft charges.

Thomson is appealing against 65 convictions of obtaining financial advantage by deception by misappropriating union funds during his term as national secretary between 2002 and 2007.

The former member for Dobell was convicted and sentenced to 12 months in prison, with nine months suspended, after a trial in the Melbourne Magistrates Court in March.

He was ordered to serve three months in prison but his lawyers lodged an appeal straight away, meaning he spent only two hours in custody before being freed on bail.

During the appeal hearing, prosecutors told the court Thomson had no authority to spend the union's funds on personal expenses.

It was alleged the expenses included brothel visits.

But Thomson's lawyer, Greg James QC, argued there should not be a case against his client.

He said when Thomson withdrew cash from his credit cards the cash was the property of the bank, not the union, so there was no basis to the theft allegations against him.

Today, the judge found the prosecution case was in error, describing it as "regrettable".


Regrettable???

Once again , the "Justice" system has shown that a lawyer will argue that black is blue if it gets their clients off.

A pox on their houses.

Mick





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