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BATTERIES, TECHNOLOGY, RAW MATERIALS, GENERAL NEWS
blacksheep
post Posted: Dec 13 2018, 10:54 PM
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Raw materials: 'holy grail' of 21st century industrial policy
By MAROS SEFCOVIC

BRUSSELS, TODAY, 09:01
QUOTE
Raw materials are indispensable for carbon-neutral solutions in all sectors of the economy.

This is among key messages presented in the European Commission's strategy towards a climate neutral Europe by 2050.

'"Hardly any metal mines have opened in the last decade,' Maros Sefcovic points out (Photo: European Commission)
Even if they go unnoticed, practically everything we use contains raw materials like steel, aluminium or copper.

Less-known metals, rare earths are essential to green technologies such as wind turbines. Lithium, nickel, cobalt and graphite are necessary for electric cars.

It is therefore clear that with Europe fully embarking on the low carbon transition, new types of assets are becoming highly strategic.

Today, the world uses 90bn tonnes of such raw materials annually.

The OECD forecasts that this will almost double to 167bn tonnes by 2060.

Without changing our consumption patterns – and moving from a "use and discard" approach towards circularity – this increased demand will place huge pressure on the planet's resources.

Fierce global competition with unwanted monopolies would accelerate.

For instance, China already controls much of the output from Congo's cobalt mines.

Both, economically and geo-strategically Europe must make sure that its current dependence on fossil fuels is not replaced by another one: on primary raw materials coming from outside our continent.

In other words, we must change the game so that raw materials do not become 'new oil'. And it requires bold collective action.

We do not start from zero
Europe already has an active raw materials strategy. Its original objectives remain valid: securing access to raw materials outside Europe, developing access to Europe's own resources, improving reuse and recycling of raw materials.

We have already chalked up some successes: getting other countries to remove unfair trade restrictions on raw materials, identifying raw materials critical for Europe and funding research and innovation accordingly.

We are also boosting exploration, second use and refining capacity when it comes to raw materials strategic for batteries.

That is why this Friday (14 December) – under the European Battery Alliance – I am meeting CEOs of main raw materials organisations as well as the European Investment Bank to step up our game.

Catching up with China
More and more of the world's raw materials are now heading in China's direction and we also see its strategic drive to have prime access to resources in Africa.

Thanks to the EU Battery Alliance launched just a year ago, Beijing's five-year lead has been shortened by two years. But much remains to be done.

Firstly, we need to diversify the raw materials' sources, for instance, by looking at Latin America, Canada and Europe's own neighbourhood.

As flagged in our 2050 strategy on climate neutrality, EU trade policy as well as our energy and climate diplomacy has a vital role to play.

I see enormous potential in a recently announced Africa-Europe Alliance – a new, more balanced partnership where Europe can help Africa develop a sustainable raw materials sector, boosting its overall economic and social development.

Moreover, just as the EU remains open for climate-friendly investment and trade, we should demand reciprocal, fair and transparently governed access to partner countries' markets, infrastructure and raw materials.

Big on the circular economy
Secondly, we need a profound shift towards recovery, re-use and recycling of raw materials in all sectors where new dependencies are emerging.

This is particularly the case for dependencies on a handful of countries outside Europe – often countries which struggle with stability or environmental and social standards.

This reduction of materials and more efficient production can translate into a true hat-trick: improved competitiveness, huge business and jobs opportunities, less pollution.

According to recent studies, a truly circular economy could reduce greenhouse emissions by up to 60 percent.

Moreover, we have an untapped 'urban mine' of secondary raw materials in products sitting around our homes.

Industry's message is loud and clear: if we were to collect all smartphones in our drawers and recycle them, we could have enough cobalt to manufacture batteries for four million electric cars.

Thirdly, we need to have a better grasp of Europe's domestic raw materials potential and match it with our regulatory framework, including fast-track permitting.

A 'holy grail' of Europe's climate neutral future
We are largely self-sufficient when it comes to wood and industrial minerals. However, hardly any metal mines have opened in the last decade, despite metals' abundance and their role in technologies reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

This goes hand in hand with people's awareness of the variety, amounts as well as origins of raw materials needed for the equipment such as mobile phones, electronics, cars, textiles, plastics or medicines.

Europe has world-leading technologies as well as high environmental and social standards and we are making sure that mining is no longer the dirty, polluting industry of the past.

Our strategy is not to displace environmental costs to other parts of the world.

Our strategy is to see sustainable mining with high-quality jobs created in Europe as well as transparent information about the environmental footprint and recyclability.

We do count on people's demanding stance: looking not only at the price but also at what goes into a product they buy.

I am convinced that raw materials are the 'holy grail' of our 21st century industrial policy and ultimately, our climate neutral future.

Therefore, we all have to move into a higher gear – industry, innovators, institutions, member states, citizens. The stakes are high, as this is a clear pre-condition for Europe to succeed.

Maros Sefcovic is vice president of the European Commission in charge of the Energy Union and EU space policy coordination.

https://euobserver.com/opinion/143691



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The herd instinct among forecasters makes sheep look like independent thinkers. Edgar Fiedler

If the freedom of speech is taken away then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter. George Washington
 
blacksheep
post Posted: Dec 13 2018, 02:40 PM
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Published on Dec 12, 2018
Presentation: Supercycle Me! Will electric vehicles drive the next mining boom?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LKEV3nc-iB4...youtu.be&a=



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The herd instinct among forecasters makes sheep look like independent thinkers. Edgar Fiedler

If the freedom of speech is taken away then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter. George Washington
 
blacksheep
post Posted: Dec 12 2018, 07:25 PM
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Daimler to buy $23 billion of battery cells for electric car drive
Edward Taylor
extract

QUOTE
FRANKFURT (Reuters) - Daimler (DAIGn.DE) will buy battery cells worth more than 20 billion euros ($23 billion) by 2030 as it readies mass production of hybrid and electric vehicles, the maker of Mercedes-Benz cars said on Tuesday.

Daimler said it was expanding its competence in battery cell research and working on next generation batteries to cut its dependence on costly rare earth minerals including cobalt, which is mainly sourced from war-torn Democratic Republic of Congo.

The Mercedes-Benz EQ electric car, set for a 2019 launch, will use battery cells containing 60 percent nickel, 20 percent manganese and 20 percent cobalt, the company said.

Apple loses in China court dispute with Qualcomm
Future Mercedes-Benz electric cars will contain batteries using 80 percent nickel and only 10 percent manganese and 10 percent cobalt, it added.

“Our engineers are also working on a ratio with 90 percent nickel, 5 percent manganese 5 percent cobalt in order to reduce the amount of rare earth metals even further,” Daimler said, adding it was also working on solid state batteries - which don’t require any cobalt - for future products.


read more - https://www.reuters.com/article/us-daimler-...e-idUSKBN1OA0OG



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The herd instinct among forecasters makes sheep look like independent thinkers. Edgar Fiedler

If the freedom of speech is taken away then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter. George Washington
 
blacksheep
post Posted: Dec 12 2018, 02:29 PM
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In Reply To: blacksheep's post @ Dec 11 2018, 09:26 AM

Coalition reveals plan to make lithium batteries 'in our own backyard'
QUOTE
Australia must not squander the “once-in-a-generation” opportunity presented by the booming demand for lithium-ion batteries and should build a dedicated manufacturing sector instead of sending the nation’s vast amounts of locally mined lithium offshore, federal government ministers have said.

The Morrison government on Tuesday released an Austrade report on lithium – a key ingredient in lithium-ion batteries, which are used in electric vehicles, electronic devices like mobile phones and laptop computers, and to store renewable energy.

Australia is well-positioned to capitalise on the “lithium-ion battery era”, the report said. Australia has the third-largest reserves of lithium in the world and is the largest producer of hard-rock lithium spodumene.

“At the moment Australia produces about half of the world’s lithium, but once it’s mined out of the ground, it’s shipped offshore, with all of the value-creation activities such as processing and battery manufacturing occurring overseas,” Trade Minister Simon Birmingham said. “Now is the time to accelerate the development of a high-tech lithium manufacturing sector in our own backyard.”

https://www.smh.com.au/business/companies/c...211-p50ljg.html

QUOTE
Attracting investment from the big battery makers

Austrade believes Australia needs to attract investment and technology transfer from existing lithium-ion battery manufacturers to develop “the required level of capability”.

It reckons we need to do this through incentives.

South Korean, Japanese, and now Chinese companies – such as Panasonic, BYD, LG Chem, and Samsung SDI — dominate the lithium-ion battery manufacturing space.

The US and several European countries have recently started to upscale their lithium-ion battery manufacturing capacity in response to increased demand for EVs.

Austrade says the Tesla/Panasonic integrated ‘Gigafactory’ in Reno, Nevada was secured in 2014 through incentives worth $US1.3 billion.


In 2016, LG Chem’s $US700 million investment in a Polish gigafactory was secured through dollar-for-dollar government funding of $US350 million, tax exemptions, employer incentives and land.

Federal minister for Trade, Tourism and Investment Simon Birmingham says it’s time to accelerate the development of a high-tech lithium manufacturing sector in Australia.

“Through Austrade’s Resources team we are ramping up our activities overseas to attract investment and highlight our significant comparative advantage such as our strong economic conditions, skilled workforce and well-established resources infrastructure network,” he says.

And it’s a bipartisan issue, with Federal Labor – who, let’s face it, will probably be in charge soon — already committing to more battery manufacturing in Australia.

“At the moment there are a few companies investing around Australia to refine battery metals and establish battery manufacturing facilities,” shadow minister for Trade and Investment Jason Clare said in October.

“This includes investments like BHP’s nickel refinery and Tianqi’s lithium processing plant in Kwinana, as well as the Sonnen battery plant in Adelaide and Energy Renaissance’s battery plant planned for Darwin.

“We want to support them to take the next step move further down the supply chain.”
These included multi-year exemptions on various taxes, transferable tax credits up to $US195 million, discounts on power, and infrastructure support
.

https://stockhead.com.au/resources/australi...or-battery-hub/

You can tell we have an election coming up biggrin.gif



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The herd instinct among forecasters makes sheep look like independent thinkers. Edgar Fiedler

If the freedom of speech is taken away then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter. George Washington
 
nipper
post Posted: Dec 12 2018, 10:46 AM
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QUOTE
At the Beijing Auto Show this year, 7 out of 10 “new energy vehicles” (NEVs) on display were by Chinese automakers. While EVs only accounted for 17% of the 1,022 models showcased, 124 of the 174 NEVs were made by domestic (Chinese) manufacturers. New energy vehicles in China refers to both battery-operated vehicles and plug-in hybrids.

The numbers are proof of the trend towards electrification of transportation in China, whereas in North America, we’re being left behind choking on diesel and gasoline fumes. Here are some more startling stats. In 2017 less than 200,000 EVs were sold in the US, versus 777,000 in China. That’s up 53% in China compared to 2016, and down 13% in the US. EVs are still a minuscule part of the massive US auto industry, accounting for just 1.2% of the 17 million vehicles sold last year. (Numbers courtesy of the South China Morning Post.)

There are a few reasons why EVs have achieved so much greater market penetration in China versus the United States. The first, unsurprisingly, is cost. The most popular range of EVs sold in China can be purchased for between USD$11,500 and $14,500 – around the cost of a used Subaru in North America. Most EVs for sale in China are produced domestically, which keeps costs down. The price tag is also considerably less than a North American model due to subsidies. The Chinese government – which wants EVs to account for 12% of all sales by 2020 – offers buyers a subsidy of up to 100,000 yuan per unit, or nearly USD$16,000. The subsidy increases, the longer the EV’s range.

US News ranked the 9 cheapest electric cars in the United States, and found the least expensive model was the 2017 Smart Electric Drive, at $23,800 before tax credits. Still a considerable sum for the average wage earner. If you want to go high-end, the 2018 Tesla S can be mortgaged for between $74,500 and $135,000+.

The second reason is infrastructure. In the US they have 48,000 charging outlets with most, 15,000, in California. China has 213,903, according to the Environmental and Energy Study Institute. The Chinese government plans to build 120,000 public charging stations by 2020.

The last reason is government support. Tax credits in the US range from $2,500 to $7,500 depending on battery capacity. While the US is using tax credits, tax exemptions and rebates to encourage EV buying (and the Trump administration wants to discontinue most), in China the subsidies are much more aggressive. Since 2014, Chinese EV buyers haven’t had to pay any tax. And local governments are supportive. Beijing and Shenzhen for example match the subsidy amount provided by the central government. The Zuzhou municipal government partnered with Singulato Motor to establish a 10 billion yuan (about USD$1.5B) fund for investing in EV research, according to the South China Morning Post.

All of this has resulted in China being the undisputed leader in the electric-vehicle market. The country currently accounts for half of the world’s EV production and sales.....
https://www.sharecafe.com.au/2018/11/19/a-beautiful-mine/



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
blacksheep
post Posted: Dec 11 2018, 11:17 AM
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Korean battery makers rushing to build plants overseas
Posted : 2018-12-10 17:41Updated : 2018-12-11 09:02
By Baek Byung-yeul

QUOTE
LG Chem, Samsung SDI and SK Innovation have been rushing to build lithium-ion battery plants in China, the United States and Europe to meet the rapidly growing global demand for electric vehicles (EVs), company officials said Monday.


https://www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/tech/2018/...133_260144.html



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The herd instinct among forecasters makes sheep look like independent thinkers. Edgar Fiedler

If the freedom of speech is taken away then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter. George Washington
 


blacksheep
post Posted: Dec 11 2018, 09:26 AM
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Lithium-rich Australia seeks to lure battery cell manufacturers
extract
QUOTE
Senator Birmingham said that through Austrade's resources team, the government was ramping up efforts to attract overseas investment in the sector and highlight Australia's comparative advantages.

That work is understood to be close to yielding results, with a significant investment by an overseas player in the sector expected to be announced before Christmas.

The report, to be released on Tuesday, found that local lithium producers are beginning to move into new areas of the supply chain, while feasibility studies are under way for local battery production, including a 15-gigawatt-hour "Gigafactory" in Townsville.

read more - https://www.afr.com/business/mining/lithium...20181210-h18xma



--------------------
The herd instinct among forecasters makes sheep look like independent thinkers. Edgar Fiedler

If the freedom of speech is taken away then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter. George Washington
 
blacksheep
post Posted: Dec 9 2018, 02:25 PM
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BATTERY RAW MATERIALS MARKET REPORT 07/12: Cobalt prices slump on year-end destocking
An overview of the battery raw materials markets and their price moves from the past week.

https://www.metalbulletin.com/Article/38482...destocking.html



--------------------
The herd instinct among forecasters makes sheep look like independent thinkers. Edgar Fiedler

If the freedom of speech is taken away then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter. George Washington

Said 'Thanks' for this post: lgrif  
 
blacksheep
post Posted: Dec 7 2018, 09:34 PM
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December 6th, 2018 by Steve Hanley

QUOTE
Korean battery company SK Innovation has announced it will build a factory to produce lithium-ion battery cells for electric cars in Jackson county, Georgia, northeast of Atlanta. The projected cost of the factory is $1.67 billion. The company says the factory will create more than 2,000 jobs once completed.

Construction of the first phase of the factory — which will cost $1 billion — will begin in early 2019 and provide 1,000 job opportunities for the local community. In a press release, the company said the new factory will be “the largest scale electric vehicle battery plant in the United States.” The folks at Tesla should find that statement interesting. Inside EVs speculates an investment of $167 billion should be enough to create a factory capable of producing 30 GWh of batteries annually.

Last month, Volkswagen indicated it is looking to SK Innovation to be a major supplier of battery cells for the electric cars it plans to manufacture in the United States. VW is known to be scouting locations for a US electric vehicle factory of its own. Whether the two companies are coordinating their search efforts so their factories can be close to each other is unknown.

Volkswagen’s head of procurement, Stefan Sommer, said earlier this year, “Within the framework of Roadmap E, the Volkswagen Group brands plan to bring 50 new full-electric models onto the roads by 2025. The Group needs battery capacity in excess of 150 GWh per year through 2025 just to equip its own electric fleet. That corresponds to an annual capacity of at least four “Gigafactories” for battery cells.” Roadmap E is VW’s plan to build up to 10 million electric vehicles using its new MEB modular chassis.

Volkswagen is hardly limiting itself to SK Innovation in its search for batteries, and SK Innovation is hardly limiting itself to Volkswagen in its search for customers. In its press statement about the new factory, it mentioned Mercedes and Hyundai/Kia as the leading candidates for the battery cells produced at the Georgia factory.

https://cleantechnica.com/2018/12/06/sk-inn...ant-in-georgia/

QUOTE
New plans by VW, Tesla and BYD support predictions that EV sales are set to skyrocket
A number of significant manufacturing and investment plans in China, Germany and North America by major automobile makers VW, Tesla and BYD are backing up predictions that electric vehicle car sales are set to skyrocket in the coming decades.

DECEMBER 6, 2018 BECKY BEETZ

https://www.pv-magazine.com/2018/12/06/new-...t-to-skyrocket/



--------------------
The herd instinct among forecasters makes sheep look like independent thinkers. Edgar Fiedler

If the freedom of speech is taken away then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter. George Washington
 
triage
post Posted: Dec 7 2018, 04:39 PM
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In Reply To: blacksheep's post @ Dec 7 2018, 02:23 PM

Or ... Trumpy has the pips with GM for closing down a number of manufacturing plants in the US after Trumpy claimed he had fixed the US car making industry. I find it doesn't pay to overthink what motivates Mr Trump, he is not cerebral he is reflex: you slight him, he slights you back.



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"The market can stay irrational longer than you can stay solvent." John Maynard Keynes

"The crisis takes a much longer time coming than you think, and then it happens much faster than you would have thought." Rudiger Dornbush

Mozart fixes everything and Messi is a dog

Said 'Thanks' for this post: blacksheep  
 
 


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