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"English as she is spoke", Our language and its quirks
henrietta
post Posted: Yesterday, 01:50 PM
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That would actually be "no one" ........

QUOTE
The SEC had also demanded oversight of the mercurial Mr Musk’s social media use. But he said in the interview that noone was proofreading his tweets.


Cheers
J

 
henrietta
post Posted: Dec 9 2018, 08:55 AM
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The bloke who coined " virtue signalling" writes an interesting article.
Cheers
J


Despite ‘virtue signalling’, words tend to fail the Right
JAMES BARTHOLOMEW


When I coined the term “virtue signalling” in an article for The Spectator, it never occurred to me that the phrase would take off. At first there were just a few mentions of it in the British press — sometimes with acknowledgments to me, sometimes not.

Then it became used more and more. Next it leapt across seas and boundaries. It appeared in India and South Africa. Then it appeared in a mainstream American newspaper — The Boston Globe, I think. I subscribed to Google notifications. At first I was delighted at each individual mention. Now there are too many to follow. They come from all across the English-speaking world every day.

For those who have not come across the phrase, it means saying something to indicate that you are a good, moral person without actually doing anything at all.


Often this is done by expressing anger and outrage. So people will say “I hate Trump” to indicate that they are the right sort of person who abhors things that Donald Trump has said and done. I saw a poster at the front of a house recently saying “Love Trumps Hate”. Implicitly the householder believes in love and opposes hate. Which means they are declaring themselves to be a good person. But note that they have declared their goodness without doing anything.

The term has really annoyed some people. The phrase is not necessarily against the Left but left-wing journalists have been particularly irritated, writing invectives against the phrase and the concept. They say it is a weapon of the “far Right” to dismiss moral behaviour and legitimate protest.

They choose to ignore the fact the original article distinguished between true virtue — such as looking after a disabled husband through the last 10 years of his life — and statements intended merely to boast of virtue without doing anything. The anger is revealing. It shows that some on the Left feel stung. The phrase has provoked them because they realise that they have taken a hit in the silent conflict you could call “word wars”.

These are continuing conflicts and skirmishes over the language we use. They take place without anyone having declared war. They are, in effect, attempts to change the way we think about things by altering the language we use.

There are many fronts on which these wars are fought. Sexuality, for example.

It was a great triumph in the war of words when those who are attracted to the same sex named themselves “gays” rather than any of the earlier disparaging and insulting words.

Race is another battleground of words with acceptable words for different races changing over time. But let’s stick to politics.

In general, the Left has been overwhelmingly more successful in word creation, starting with “socialism”. The word is based on “social”, which is a friendly sort of word. It’s vastly more companionable than the term “levellers”, which some people in Britain with a desire for more equality were called in the 17th century.

The phrase “social justice” was a clever victory for the Left, too. It brought together that friendly word “social” with “justice”. How could anyone be opposed to that? But, in fact, it was always a device to make left-wing policies sound as though they were merely a matter of justice.

Another big coup was when, in 1962, a group of sociologists got together at a conference in Britain. The poverty that existed before World War II was decreasing year by year. The statistics clearly showed more people owning washing machines and televisions, having indoor toilets and so on.

The sociologists wanted to shock people — or you might say they wanted to keep themselves in business — and they came up with the brilliant idea of redefining poverty. Eventually they decided that someone was in poverty if they had only 60 per cent of average earnings. Bingo! Poverty was back!

In fact, it would continue forever because there would always be people on less than the average income unless the government ­determined all incomes at a level rate and ownership of property was banned.

In other words, unless something akin to communism was imposed. Their great success was to persuade governments — and then international institutions such as the OECD — to accept their redefinition of the word.

Just occasionally, the Right has won a battle or two. Margaret Thatcher did well by calling for “free markets” and “free enterprise” rather than using the term capitalism — a word that Marx and tens of thousands of university lecturers around the world had succeeded in besmirching.

More recently, the Right has done pretty well with sarcasm, using the term “social justice warrior” or just “SJW” for short.

In these wars, many terms are created but most don’t catch on. Tom Switzer, the director of the Centre for Independent Studies, tells me he was once insulted as an “RWNJ”.

Mystified? So was I. It is meant to stand for “right-wing nutjob”. But it is pretty difficult to say those letters, so I guess the abbreviation will be left behind on the field of battle as an ineffective weapon.

The Left is now trying to label those it doesn’t like as “fascists”. I suspect that this, also, is a bridge too far. It relies on the public being totally ignorant of history and not realising that Mussolini, Franco and Hitler were dictators and that however loathsome Trump may or may not be, he can be removed by the American people in two years at the next presidential election.

Similarly, if you call Churchill a “fascist”, how come he was fighting Hitler?

Long ago, though, the Left pulled off a great trick in getting most people to think that fascism was right wing.

Fascism’s roots were, in fact, overwhelmingly on the Left and closely connected to trade unions, particularly in Italy. The full name of the Nazi party was the National Socialist Party. It was “national” socialist to distinguish itself from the international socialists in the Soviet Union.

And so the word wars continue. The Left generally has had the upper hand. But there are many more battles to come.

James Bartholomew is a British commentator and author of The Welfare of Nations who is visiting Australia as the Centre for Independent Studies’ 2018 scholar-in-residence.



Said 'Thanks' for this post: triage  nipper  
 
nipper
post Posted: Dec 7 2018, 08:23 AM
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In Reply To: nipper's post @ Dec 7 2018, 07:29 AM

Of course, these shifts and peculiarities are well covered. Frank Moorhouse wrote "The Americans, Baby" in 1972 and Bill Bryson, among others, covered the US - British aspects of change in "The Mother Tongue" and "Made in America".



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
nipper
post Posted: Dec 7 2018, 07:29 AM
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also in The Australian
QUOTE
When my teenage kids started to bring their school friends to our home in the early 2000s, I insisted the young visitors call me by my first name. I mean, I was (and still am) very much a “with it” sort of dad who wanted to be seen as relaxed and casual. None of this “hello Mr Salt” formality for me. Please, just call me Bernard.

But it seems Bernard is not such an easy word to say these days, especially for the younger generation. They are inclined to pronounce it the American way, with the emphasis on the second syllable: Ber-nard. (When I’m in the US, locals have difficulty with my name, too — they repeat it back to me as “David”.) This puzzled me, until I realised that what I was witnessing, via the Bernard Pronunciation Shift, was the powerful influence that had transformed Australia’s cultural landscape a generation earlier.

For almost 200 years we took our cues from Britain; during the ’60s, as our ties with the UK weakened, the Vietnam War brought us closer to the US. By the ’70s, American music, TV and film were being soaked up by a remarkably absorbent Australian culture. The class-based struggles of England’s On the Buses and Steptoe and Son gave way to the sunny and aspirational optimism of Mister Ed and Bewitched. Young Australians rapidly adopted the language of America. I reckon “bloke” gave way to “guy” by 1972. Sheila simply hasn’t been cited in polite company since the ’60s. And soon enough instant coffee had replaced brewed tea and words like cool became, well, cool.

We resisted acquiescence to certain hyper-American terms such as neat, swell and goofy, although a car’s engine cover is now referred to as a hood; bonnet, it seems, is a tad twee. At the other end of the car the influence of Britain remains, as boot refuses to give way to trunk. I suspect the Americanisation of our language is steadily making its way through the car from front to rear: the stoic British blinker has yielded just this century to the wanton advances of the American indicator.

Also, it is apparent that butt has bettered bum and I don’t think we’ve been enriched by the experience. Please, my fellow Australians, let us draw the line at booty, which should never be anything more than a newborn’s knitted footwear. I imagine a kind of booty line could be drawn across the Pacific, falling somewhere between Hawaii and the Great Barrier Reef and declaring to the American people: Your language can come this far and no further. Kindly keep your goofy, your math and your tomato to the confines of your sovereign domain. For we will decide which words might enter our language and the terms by which they are to be absorbed.

We Australians are wont to reckon, whereas Americans figure. When reckon falls, when booty breaches the coastline, when mum manifests as mom, it may be said that the cultural subjugation of our nation is complete. Make no mistake, what started with Ber-nard is making a beeline for mom.

We Australians are a predominantly colonial people who are eager to absorb the mannerisms of more powerful cultures. Indeed, I wonder whether by the middle of this century our everyday language might not include fashionable words in Mandarin or Hindi. Maybe we should be protecting, or at least celebrating, the linguistic and cultural peculiarities that make Australians uniquely and proudly Australian. Do y’all agree?
https://www.theaustralian.com.au/life/weeke...ce56d22?login=1

... and this time the plentiful comments are worth a read



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne

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henrietta
post Posted: Nov 24 2018, 03:21 PM
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From the Weekend Australian

QUOTE
Some witnesses struggled, some survived and some shined.


Cheers
J

 
henrietta
post Posted: Nov 22 2018, 01:53 PM
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One Mitch Mott in the Adelaide Advertiser

QUOTE
SA Power Network crews were sent to repair power lines which felled from strong winds or snagged by broken branches across Adelaide, including on Marion Rd, Mitchell Park and Seaview Rd next to Henley Beach Hotel.

Sand bags were being distributed to properties and SES volunteers were kept busy as the night unfolded.


I know that predictive text can be to blame, but doesn't anyone ever read these reports before publishing ? " as the night unfolded" ??!!

Cheers
J

 


nipper
post Posted: Nov 8 2018, 06:14 AM
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Word of the Year 2018

Single use: Made to be used once only.

Backstop: A system that will come into effect if no other arrangement is made.

Floss: A dance in which people twist their hips in one direction while swinging their arms in the opposite direction with the fists closed.

Gammon: A person, typically male, middle-aged and white, with reactionary views, especially one who supports the withdrawal of Britain from the European Union.

Gaslight: To attempt to manipulate (a person) by continually presenting them with false information until they doubt their sanity.

MeToo: Denoting a cultural movement that seeks to expose and eradicate predatory sexual behaviour, especially in the workplace.

Plogging: A recreational activity that combines jogging with picking up litter.

VAR: Video assistant referee.



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
joules mm1
post Posted: Oct 22 2018, 04:33 PM
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In Reply To: nipper's post @ Oct 22 2018, 03:11 PM

I recognize (or recognise) one of those:
binomial distribution

after a fierce Szechuan chili

blink.gif
I was warned "mate, buy no meal in this part of town"
I did
the distribution was ......wide
(I'll get me coat!)



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. . . . . . . . everything has an art.....in the instance of the auction process, the only thing, needed to be listened to; price

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nipper
post Posted: Oct 22 2018, 03:11 PM
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In Reply To: balance's post @ Oct 22 2018, 02:13 PM

yes, clearly we have to adapt to our new silicon-based lifeform

Concept of the day:
robotics quotient Robotics quotient (RQ) is a way of scoring humans’ ability to work effectively with robots, just as intelligence quotient (IQ) tests provide a score that helps gauge human cognitive abilities.

And other, new or updated terms
mindshare (share of mind)
acceptable spam report rate
smart bandage
next issue avoidance (NIA)
SOLID (software design principles)
secondary storage
Android Studio
binomial distribution

>Artificial ignorance, by the way .... in network behavior anomaly detection (NBAD), is the strategic practice of disregarding noisy data in log files. A network manger who decides to use artificial ignorance must first establish a baseline for normal log activity. Once parameters have been established, programming in software can alert the manager when there is activity outside the norm. Or something.



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"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne

Said 'Thanks' for this post: draughtsman  
 
balance
post Posted: Oct 22 2018, 02:13 PM
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In Reply To: nipper's post @ Oct 21 2018, 07:18 PM

QUOTE
"Artificial ignorance"


Good old fashioned acting dumb?




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Day Trader: Lowest form of life in the known universe.
Shorter: Can limbo under a day trader.
Investor: Salt of the Earth.Sits to the right of God (Warren Buffet)
Share prices are only ever manipulated down.
Paper losses are not really losses.
Chat site posters always know better & know more than anyone about anything.
I'm 29.
The cheque is in the mail.
 
 


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