Logo
Registered Members Login:
   
Forgotten Your Details? Click Here To Recover +
Welcome to ShareScene - Talk Shares And Take Stock With Australia's Sharemarket Community - New Here? Click To Register >

Important Notice For All Members - ShareScene Is Moving

3 Pages (Click to Jump) V   1 2 3 >   
 
  
Reply to this topic

FUTURE TECHNOLOGY
nipper
post Posted: Nov 22 2018, 03:09 PM
  Quote Post


Posts: 5,053
Thanks: 1880


Silent plane with no moving parts makes ‘historic’ flight

QUOTE
The blue glowing jets of science fiction spacecraft came a step closer to reality as US physicists unveiled the world’s first solid-state aeroplane powered in flight by supercharged air molecules.

More than a century on from the Wright brothers’ first artificial flight, scientists hailed the “historic” test of the new technology, which could eventually slash greenhouse-gas emissions from aviation. Still in it’s infancy, it could one day usher in silent drones and aircraft, as well as engines with no infrared signal and thus impossible to detect.

Ever since Orville and Wilbur Wright’s momentous glide in the winter of 1903, aircraft have been driven by propellers or jets that must burn fuel to create the thrust and lift needed for sustained flight.A team of experts from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology managed to unlock a process known as electroaerodynamics, previously never seen as a plausible way to power an aircraft.

They were able to fly the new plane, with a wingspan of five metres, a distance of 55 metres at a speed of 4.8 metres-per-second. That’s hardly supersonic, but the implications of this unprecedented mode of flight could be stratospheric.

“The future of flight shouldn’t be things like propellers and turbines,” said Steven Barrett, who designed the prototype. “It should be more like what you see in Star Trek with a kind of blue glow and something that silently glides through the air.”

At first glance, the plane itself doesn’t look lightyears away from other renewable aircraft, such as the Solar Impact II craft that in 2015-16 used energy from the Sun to fly around the world.

Unlike Solar Impact, Barrett’s plane doesn’t have any propellers or solar panels - or any movable parts whatsoever.

Instead of engines, it is powered by a system comprising two main sections. At the front of the plane sit a series of parallel electrodes made up of lightweight wires that produce an enormous voltage, +20,000v , supercharging the air around it and splitting away negatively charged nitrogen molecules known as ions.

At the plane’s rear are rows of aerofoils set to -20,000v. The ions automatically move from a positive to negative charge, dragging with them air particles that create the so-called “ionic wind” to provide the aircraft with lift.

‘SOMETHING WE NEVER KNEW POSSIBLE’

The technology to create ionic wind has been around since the 1960s, but it was previously thought nowhere near efficient enough to prove useful to aeronautics.

The team not only showed that it was possible for ion-driven craft to fly but also - due to the relative lack of drag created by the electrodes - predicted that efficiency would increase in lock-step with speed, potentially opening the way for bigger, faster planes in future.“It’s clearly very early days: but the team at MIT have done something we never previously knew was possible, in using accelerated ionised gas to propel an aircraft,” said Guy Gratton, aerospace engineer and visiting professor at Cranfield University, who was not involved in the study.

Barrett said he believed the current prototype could be scaled up “a significant amount” but cautioned that their may be a limit to how much propulsion the technique can produce.

“We don’t yet know if there is such a limit and we will certainly try to scale up as much as possible,” he said. “I don’t yet know if you’ll see our vehicle carrying people any time soon but obviously I’d be very excited if that was the case.”

COMMERCIAL APPLICATIONS

He said that the technology could be used on the skin of commercial aircraft, reducing drag and therefore the energy needed to power modern passenger jets.

“This would be much more efficient than the current situation where you have concentrated engines that generate thrust, which have to fight against a large passive airframe that generates drag,” he said.

This is the kind of things researchers hope will one day be possible.

In an editorial, the journal Nature, which published the study, said its success would encourage other sectors to revisit technology that was long thought to be confined to sci-fi films. It listed possible military applications including the development of silent drones and aircraft, and engines with no infrared signal and thus impossible to detect.

The prototype flight “will stimulate both awe and anxiety,” it said. A hundred and fifteen years ago, Nature published a short news item on the Wright brothers’ “first successful achievement of artificial flight.” Barrett and the team noted a pleasing parallel with their revolutionary test and the one that sparked the aerial age: both flights lasted all of 12 seconds.






--------------------
"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne

Said 'Thanks' for this post: lgrif  
 
nipper
post Posted: Nov 22 2018, 03:01 PM
  Quote Post


Posts: 5,053
Thanks: 1880


The future of farming is here
QUOTE
- Tiny sensors that stick to crop leaves and transmit health data.
- Robot buggies that trundle up and down orchard rows.
- Hyperspectral scanners to assess tree health.
- Smartphone-operated virtual cattle fences.
- Gene manipulation to transform crops so they’re a different colour or last longer, or bear fruit in a more convenient way.

From the gently fading traditional idea of a dusty farmer wearing a slouch hat with maybe a blue heeler trotting along behind the ute, Australian agriculture has moved into the uber-tech world of lasers and data dumps, drone surveillance and DNA analysis.

CSIRO’s patented virtual fences - operated from smartphones or tablets - work with cattle that wear GPS-enabled collars that make a noise if a beast gets too close to the virtual fence. If the animal ignores the noise and keeps moving toward the fence, the collar delivers a single, mild, electric pulse (much less startling than the shock of an electric fence). The beasts soon learn to steer clear of the invisible fences.

In big cattle country, says James Pratley, an expert from Charles Sturt University, farmers now can fence off watering points and, at one end of the enclosure, install a bridge with an electronic set of scales and a sensor that can read the individual beasts’ ear tags. The cattle can go into the enclosure via the bridge but they can’t leave that way. So each time an animal goes to drink, its weight is recorded, and the farmers know whether the herd is gaining weight and how often the animals are going to the water.

Pratley says the management opportunities using this kind of technology are endless. There’s even a capsule that can be inserted into cattle’s rumen, or first stomach, that will record the temperature of each beast and transmit data to inform farmers, for instance, when a particular animal is unwell.

“Increasingly, new-age farmers are collecting as much data as they can, and they’re using that in their everyday decision-making,” Pratley says. “They need the data now to decide whether to water, whether to harvest, whether to fertilise, or whatever. The biggest problem for them is internet capability. People don’t realise that agriculture is one of the major users of the internet.”

Meanwhile, robotics research is moving so fast it soon will solve Australia’s perennial agriculture labour shortage, he says. “Down the track that will all be done by robots,” Pratley says. “It’s starting to happen now, and that will go on at an increasing rate over the next five to 10 years.”

In Britain, the experimental GummiArm robot moves like a human with limbs that can be adjusted to be soft-touch or stiff, depending on the fruit or vegetable to be harvested, and it has sensors that assess crops, such as cauliflower, to determine which particular plants to harvest and which to leave for further ripening.

Andrew Grant, co-founder of Adelaide-based agtech development company Availer, says there’s a lot of movement in agri­robotics, and this will have all sorts of occupational health and safety benefits by removing humans from the danger zone of pesticide spray drift and replacing them with machines, for instance.

“We’re looking at little robots, like little buggies the size of 10 shoeboxes, that will move along the rows with cameras on them, monitoring the trees,” he says. “Hyperspectral lasers (that collect and process information from the entire electromagnetic spectrum, including gamma rays, X-rays, ultraviolet, infrared, micro­waves and radio waves) will look at the leaves, fruit and stem, and farmers will get data to say this tree has this kind of rot, or on this tree the leaves are looking dry, so there might be an irrigation issue. In five or 10 years, I can see these things working when we’re asleep.”

In other developments, Grant says individualised solutions are coming to agriculture, just as personalised medicine is becoming popular. “For example, there’s a group in Adelaide that does DNA analysis of soil,” he says, adding that it determines how best to treat the soil so it works best with certain types of produce.

And in the dairy field, Availer is working on a development called Dairy Explorer that will give dairy farmers a real-time quality read on the milk their cows are producing, by shooting a laser into the milk to get an indicative analysis of the fat, protein and somatic cell count which will then pop up on a farmer’s smartphone.

Elsewhere, scientists have used CRISPR gene editing to develop better, longer-lasting, more easily harvestable fruits and vegetables, such as Cape gooseberries (also known as ground cherries - small orange fruit with a papery outer leaf) that have been genetically altered to fruit in clumps rather than difficult-to-harvest single fruits, and with berries that don’t drop off early, eliminating the undesirable traits that have made them difficult to grow commercially.

Apple breeds, too, now can be gene-edited so they don’t brown after cutting, by inserting a gene that blocks the polyphenol oxidase enzyme gene responsible for browning.

Then there’s the whiz-bang new way of keeping an eye on potential fruit-fly infestations, one of the latest gifts from science to hardworking farmers.

Normally, humans have to check individually every fruit-fly trap, baited with pheromones or food, on a repetitive and labour-intensive round. But new traps from Australian tech start-up Rapid­AIM use low-powered smart sensors that recognise a fruit fly’s wing-beat pattern within the trap, discerning it from the wing beat of other insects caught in it. The sensors then send an alert to the “cloud” using a radio-modulated technique, and straight on to farmers via a linked mobile app.

In Israel, scientists are working on a tiny pollinator drone that can create enough breeze to blow the pollen of greenhouse plants around to get pollination going, and at the University of California, Berkeley researchers are perfecting a remotely operated pesticide robot that can assess the health of a grapevine and spray exactly the amount of pesticide needed in precisely the place it is needed.

Meanwhile, researchers in the US and Saudi Arabia have even come up with drones that can disperse 3D-printed biodegradable sensors, called PlantCopters, modelled on dandelion flowers and maple seeds, that can spiral through the air like tiny helicopters. These sensors then get attached to the leaves of crops, where they can keep track of plant health and growth and the surrounding microclimate. This data then can be transmitted by Bluetooth wireless technology. Still in its infancy, work on the PlantCopters has appeared in an electronics journal.

The brave, new world of farming is data-streaming as well as hay baling, robot programming as well as cattle branding, and using lasers, drones and hyperspectral scanning, as well as crutching and harvesting.

Technology already has taken a lot of the grunt out of agriculture, and this trend is set to accelerate in the years to come, helping farmers make the most of their land and “optimise” its productivity.

After all, says Grant, Australia has its own natural limits, and hi-tech solutions can help overcome many barriers to productivity. “We have no more land, no more rain; we have a finite ecosystem,” he says. “We need economic optimisation, efficiency optimisation, sustainability optimisation. We need to make it work for us.”




--------------------
"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 
blacksheep
post Posted: Oct 19 2018, 12:01 PM
  Quote Post


Posts: 5,115
Thanks: 2044


In Reply To: Pendragon's post @ Oct 19 2018, 11:41 AM

Just call for one of these biggrin.gif autonomous flying machines.
https://www.ted.com/talks/rodin_lyasoff_how...vel?language=en



--------------------
The herd instinct among forecasters makes sheep look like independent thinkers. Edgar Fiedler

If the freedom of speech is taken away then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter. George Washington

Said 'Thanks' for this post: Pendragon  
 
Pendragon
post Posted: Oct 19 2018, 11:41 AM
  Quote Post


Posts: 81
Thanks: 28


In Reply To: blacksheep's post @ Oct 19 2018, 11:28 AM

But will they get me to Fraser Island and back??


 
blacksheep
post Posted: Oct 19 2018, 11:28 AM
  Quote Post


Posts: 5,115
Thanks: 2044



THE FUTURE OF EVERYTHING
How Autonomous Vehicles Will Reshape Our World

Self-driving cars are just one piece of the puzzle. Former New York City traffic commissioner Samuel I. Schwartz (aka Gridlock Sam) explains.

QUOTE
Everything around us will be altered by autonomous vehicles—our roads, our warehouses and even our definition of what a car can be. Say goodbye to four wheels and a running board; the cars of the future will barely resemble the vehicles choking our cities today.

read more - https://www.wsj.com/articles/how-autonomous...orld-1539871201




--------------------
The herd instinct among forecasters makes sheep look like independent thinkers. Edgar Fiedler

If the freedom of speech is taken away then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter. George Washington
 
nipper
post Posted: Sep 15 2018, 06:15 PM
  Quote Post


Posts: 5,053
Thanks: 1880


QUOTE
AI Superpowers by Kai-Fu Lee is a must-read assessment of this battlefield [with his] concept of “Four Waves” in AI development. Chinese companies are giving Silicon Valley a run for its money.

First Wave: Internet AI. These are the now-ubiquitous online “recommendation engines,” like the products Amazon says you should want, or the “suggested videos” that keep you on YouTube for hours. Those recommendations come from the data we generate with our clicks and other online activity. Lee thinks China’s data advantage gives it a slight lead over US counterparts in this segment.

Second Wave: Business AI. This is where we see computers analyzing data to make judgements once reserved for humans: loan underwriting, cancer diagnoses, and so on. AI excels in considering far-flung datapoints that a human analyst would discount or miss completely. Lee says the US has a commanding lead for now but China’s lag may actually help by letting it leapfrog over legacy technologies. The country went straight from cash to mobile payments, for instance, bypassing the clunky credit card apparatus we have difficulty abandoning.

Third Wave: Perception AI. You’ve heard about the Internet of Things. The devices around us, once connected to each other, will merge the physical and online environments into one seamless world. China has the lead in sensor technology and is already using it in factories, retailing, and law enforcement. Already they have stores where you literally scan your face to pay the bill. No card, no device, just the face that’s always with you. That’s where we are all going and China is going there first.

Fourth Wave: Autonomous AI. Machines that can both make decisions and sense the world around them will eventually operate independently. Autonomous vehicles are the most familiar example but it won’t end there. Imagine drone swarms extinguishing forest fires or painting your house. Chinese scientists are working on such things.




--------------------
"Every long-term security is nothing more than a claim on some expected future stream of cash that will be delivered into the hands of investors over time. For a given stream of expected future cash payments, the higher the price investors pay today for that stream of cash, the lower the long-term return they will achieve on their investment over time." - Dr John Hussman

"If I had even the slightest grasp upon my own faculties, I would not make essays, I would make decisions." ― Michel de Montaigne
 


joules mm1
post Posted: Sep 13 2018, 02:22 PM
  Quote Post


Posts: 914
Thanks: 194


https://twitter.com/i/moments/1039952720839565313
Apple announced the first 7-nanometer chip for mobile
Technology This morning
The new A12 Bionic chip improves augmented reality experiences and will make the phone 50% faster.
forget Moore's law?




--------------------
. . . . . . . . everything has an art.....in the instance of the auction process, the only thing, needed to be listened to; price

Said 'Thanks' for this post: nipper  
 
mullokintyre
post Posted: Aug 9 2018, 12:36 PM
  Quote Post


Posts: 1,615
Thanks: 576


Here's a bit of potential game changing technology.

the new gps

The above article is spivvy sales leader for the company XYO.

However, going beyond the sales click bait, the technology is the really interesting thing.
The tiny GPS equivalents are cheap to mass produce and can be put in just about anything (including cars, planes, bijes, computers, even in your fridge, just don't ask me why).


Mick



--------------------
sent from my Olivetti Typewriter.
 
joules mm1
post Posted: Jul 25 2018, 01:40 PM
  Quote Post


Posts: 914
Thanks: 194


https://twitter.com/i/status/1021960732651470850
Reuters Top News‏Verified account @Reuters 10m10 minutes ago

A keyboard you can crumple like paper: How AI helped South Korea researchers create the bendy device



--------------------
. . . . . . . . everything has an art.....in the instance of the auction process, the only thing, needed to be listened to; price
 
blacksheep
post Posted: Jan 5 2018, 09:26 PM
  Quote Post


Posts: 5,115
Thanks: 2044


Visualizing the Massive $15.7 Trillion Impact of AI - http://www.visualcapitalist.com/economic-i...ntelligence-ai/

QUOTE
According to PwC’s most recent report on the topic, the impact of artificial intelligence (AI) will be transformative.

By 2030, AI is expected to provide a $15.7 trillion boost to GDP worldwide – the equivalent of adding 13 new Australias to the global economy.

A GEOGRAPHIC BREAKDOWN
Where will AI’s impact be most pronounced?

According to PwC, China will be the region receiving the most economic benefit ($7.0 trillion) from AI being integrated into various industries:

Region Economic Impact of AI (2030) % of Total
China $7.0 trillion 44.6%
North America $3.7 trillion 23.6%
Northern Europe $1.8 trillion 11.5%
Developed Asia $0.9 trillion 5.7%
Southern Europe $0.7 trillion 4.5%
Latin America $0.5 trillion 3.2%
Rest of World $1.2 trillion 7.6%
Total $15.7 trillion 100.0%
Further, the global growth from AI can be divided into two major areas, according to PwC: labor productivity improvements ($6.6 trillion) and increased consumer demand ($9.1 trillion).

INDUSTRIES MOST AFFECTED
But how will AI impact industries on an individual level?

For that, we turn to Accenture’s recent report, which breaks down a similar projection of $14 trillion of gross value added (GVA) by 2035, with estimates for AI’s impact on specific industries.

Industry 2035 GVA (Baseline) 2035 GVA (AI steady state)
Manufacturing $8.4 trillion $12.2 trillion
Professional Services $7.5 trillion $9.3 trillion
Wholesale & Retail $6.2 trillion $8.4 trillion
Public Services $4.0 trillion $4.9 trillion
Information & Communication $3.7 trillion $4.7 trillion
Financial Services $3.4 trillion $4.6 trillion
Construction $2.8 trillion $3.3 trillion
Transportation & Storage $2.1 trillion $2.9 trillion
Manufacturing will see nearly $4 trillion in growth from AI alone – and many other industries will undergo significant changes as well.

To learn more about other tech that will have a big impact on our future, see a Timeline of Future Technology.




--------------------
The herd instinct among forecasters makes sheep look like independent thinkers. Edgar Fiedler

If the freedom of speech is taken away then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter. George Washington
 
 


3 Pages (Click to Jump) V   1 2 3 >

Back To Top Of Page
Reply to this topic


You agree through the use of ShareCafe, that you understand and accept the TERMS OF USE.


TERMS OF USE  -  CONTACT ADMIN  -  ADVERTISING